Archive for the ‘guantanamo’ Category

January/February 2009

February 15, 2009

The following articles appeared in the January/February 2009 issue of the New York based Catholic Worker. Any web links below are to related materials on the web and not to the Catholic Worker.

  • To Welcome the Stranger by Jim Reagan – Commentary on our harsh immigration laws that break families apart. Refers to plights of RoxRoy Salmon and Jean Montrevil. Refers to the seemingly dead Child Citizen Protection Act and notes that about 280,000 immigrants are currently being detained by ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement)
  • Prisons Beyond  Guantanamo by Matt Vogel – An article that reminds readers that there is a whole host of overseas US prisons where human rights have been violated and those are just the prisons we know about. References Bagram in Afghanistan, Camp Bucca and Camp Cropper in Iraq, as well as suspected prisons in Eastern Europe and Diego Garcia.
  • A Tragedy in Bushwick by Felton Davis – Chronicles the positive response of a community in the face of two brothers beaten (one to death) in Brooklyn either for walking arm in arm and/or daring to be immigrants. Deceased was Jose Sucuzhanay.
  • St. Pat’s in Miyako (Okinawa, Japan) by Pat Sullivan, OFM Cap – An account of the 50th anniversary of the founding of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Miyako.
  • Prophetic Voices Never Die by Louie Vitale, OFM – A reflection on how the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on war and poverty are applicable today.
  • My Sojourn at the NYCW by Francisco Fernandez – A recollection of his experiences at Catholic Worker houses back in the 1950s and his experience with US immigration authorities.
  • Book Review: Army of None by Aimee Allison and David Solnit. Seven Stories Press, New York, NY 2007. Reviewed by Fr. Bill Pickard. – Favorable review of book aiming to dry up pools of military applicants through “truth in recruiting” and building other opportunities for young people.  Asserts that only 6% of recruits get the bonuses promised to them. [Daniel’s note – If someone can either document that number or some other number, let me know and I’ll update this entry.]
  • Beds Taken by Bureaucracy by Tanya Theriault – Relates the struggles of faith-based homeless shelters to comply with New York City rules for aid. References New York Partnership for the Homeless and Coalition for the Homeless. Notes the dangers of faith-based organizations relying on government for assistance.
  • Book Review: The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism by Andrew J. Bacevich. Metropolitan Books, Henry Holt and Company, New York, 2008. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of book asserting that America is deeply threatened by consumerism, addiction to foreign oil and above all, a belief that we are divinely ordained to rule the world.
  • Cluster Bombs: No! by Bill Griffin – An exhortation for the United States to sign the Convention on Cluster Munitions. References Travis Bradach-Nall, an American serviceman killed by US cluster munitions in July 2003 and a GAO report about US casualties from US mines and unexploded ordinance. Report appears to be Information on U.S. Use of Land Mines in the Persian Gulf War GAO-02-1003 (September 2002).
  • Chrystie Street by Edgar Forand – A reprint from the May 1963 Catholic Worker detailing the joys and many challenges of life in the Chrystie Street Catholic Worker House, including dealing with drug-addicted young people and getting fresh produce from convents.
  • Friendship in Community by Ted Walker – Reflections on his brief but uplifting friendship with the 91 year old Edgar Forand. Includes reflections on the need for quiet time and how relationships get formed.

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As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Oct/Nov 2008: Abbreviated

January 31, 2009

On the principle that something is better than nothing at all, this month’s digest will once again be a simple listing of titles and authors. This is for the October/November 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker.

Any hyperlinks below are to related information on the web and not to the article in the paper.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Apr/May 2007

April 29, 2007

The March/April 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Just Phone Rates in Jail by Matt Vogel – Article explores the extremely high phone rates most families have to pay to speak to incarcerated loved ones and the negative effect this has on rehabilitation. Commends New York for giving up its kickback from the phone company it gave a prison monopoly to.
  • Anger Grows in City Streets by Chris Zimmerman – Describes angry neighborhood reaction to police shooting of Timur Pearson. Describes New Black Panther Party incitement to “put some fear into the system.” [Daniel’s Note – The CW does NOT endorse the BPP’s methods or most of its platform.]
  • Iraqis Face New Sorrow by Cathy Breen – Letters from Jordan about Iraqi Refuges and the Iraqi government’s decision to issue new passports and force refugees to return to Baghdad to get them. Letters describe deteriorating conditions for refugees in Jordan and faults US and Britain for unwillingness to take refugees their war created.
  • Spring Appeal by Editors – The Catholic Worker needs your help! Please send your NON-tax-deductible contribution to the address listed under “subscriptions.” Any amount will help them.
  • Peter Maurin Farm by Else M. Dowdy – A reflection on the last years of Theodore Rooselvet Ridlon, long time CW resident.
  • Five Years Too Long! by Matthew W. Daloisio – Describes continuing protests against the Guantanamo Bay prison run by the United States. Describes efforts to bring the names of detainees into federal courts. Mentions group Witness Against Torture. To bring a speaker to your community or for more information on the Campaign to Shut Down Guantanamo, please contact Matthew W. Daloisio, 55 E. 3rd Street, NY, NY, 10003, (201) 264-4424.
  • Theodore Rooselvet Ridlon, Our “Slim” by Tom Cornell – A tribute to the life of long time Catholic Worker and walker. His origins were shrouded in mystery, but he was kind to all.
  • Death Penalty Review Raise Questions by Alice and Staughton Lynd and Bill Griffin – Reaction and dialog to book review of Death of Innocents in the December 2006 Catholic Worker.
  • Abbe Pierre, R.I.P. by Bill Griffin – Obituary of French Resistance member and later homeless activist Fr. Henri Groues. Abbe Pierre was the founder of the Emmaus Community.
  • Sr. Ruth Heaney, OSB by Rosalie Reigle – Obituary of a Catholic Worker pioneer and prisoner advocate who kept active through her 80s. She received several awards in her lifetime, including the Elaine Aber Humanitarian Award from the Missouri Association for Social Welfare and the papal award Pro Ecclesia et Pontiface. She was married with six children before becoming a nun.
  • More on Ruth Heaney by Cyril Echele – Recollection of Sr. Ruth Heaney by a friend of many years.
  • Memories of Bishop Proano by Joseph E. Mulligan, SJ – Reflections on the prophetic life of Ecuadorian bishop Leonidas Proano, the “bishop of the Indians” with special attention to his work in the 1970s and persecution by Ecuadorian authorities.
  • Book Review – The Call to Discernment in Troubled Times: New Perspectives on the Transformative Wisdom of Ignatius of Loyola by Dean Brackley, SJ , Crossroads Publishing, New York, 2004 Reviewed by Gail M. Presbey. – Mostly favorable review of a new look at St. Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises. Notes author provides three requirements to keep in touch with reality – 1) Let the reality of suffering reach us; 2) undergo personal transformation; and 3) seek wisdom in community.
  • Book Review – To Wisdom Through Failure: A Journey of Compassion, Resistance and Hope. by Larry Rosebaugh, OMI. EPICA, Washington, DC, 2006 Reviewed by Karl Meyer – Favorable review of missionary and peace activist Fr. Larry Rosebaugh. Stories of work in Guatemala, Mexico, El Salvador and while imprisoned.

 

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

 

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

 

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

 

To Subscribe:

 

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

 

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

 

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Jan/Feb 2007: Poem from Gitmo

March 1, 2007

Because people held at Guantanamo Bay rarely get to speak in their own words, I am reproducing the poem written by Usama Abu Kabir and printed by the Catholic Worker in the Jan/Feb 2007 issue.

Is it true that the grass
grows again after rain?
Is it true that the flowers
will rise up in the spring?
Is it true that birds
will migrate home again?
Is it true that the salmon
swim back up their stream?

Is it true. This is true. These are all miracles.
But is it true that one day
we’ll leave Guantanamo Bay?
Is it true that one day
we’ll go back to our homes?
I sail in my dreams, I am dreaming of home.

To be with my children, each one part of me;
To be with my wife, and the ones that I love;
To be with my parents,
my world’s tenderest hearts.
I dream to be home, to be free of this cage.

But do you hear me, O Judge,
do you hear me at all?
We are innocent, here,
we’ve committed no crime.
Set me free, set us free, if anywhere still
May justice, compassion
remain in this world!

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To those who want to turn their backs on Mr. Abu Kabir, I repeat this information from the December 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker:

  • Shut Down Guantanamo! by Frida Berrigan & Matthew W. Daloisio – An account of the work done by legal, medical and social groups in 2006 to try and close down the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Article offers this breakdown of 517 prisoners at Guantanamo based on Social Science Research Network analysis of recently released DoD data:
    • al-Qaeda fighters only made up 8% of prisoners.
    • Only 5% of prisoners were captured on the battlefield.
    • 86% of the prisoners were captured by either Pakistan or the Northern Alliance and turned over to US custody for payment of large bounties.
    • The article also notes that as of July 2006, 75% of the prisoners were no longer being interrogated.

Is Mr. Abu Kabir innocent? I don’t know, but the odds look good.

Charge and offer a truly fair trial or release the prisoners. Shut down the prison. Shut down the base. Return to our professed values. Let us re-earn the right to issue human rights reports with a straight face.

December 2006

January 21, 2007

The December 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Light that Gives Us Hope by Christopher M. Zimmerman – Reflections on 9/11/2001 vs. Christmas. The first has become a day of division and government encouraged fear, the second means “light coming into darkness and hope chasing away gloom.” Recommends celebrating a festival on September 16th known as One Hundred Days to Christmas.
  • People’s Movement in Oaxaca by Deirdre Cornell – An account of the AEPO, the State Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca. Description of the diverse nature of this democracy movement in one of Mexico’s poorest states. Also has some background on an indigenous decision making system know as “usos y costumbres (literally, uses and customs) based on traditional models and participation.
  • Shut Down Guantanamo! by Frida Berrigan & Matthew W. Daloisio – An account of the work done by legal, medical and social groups in 2006 to try and close down the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Article offers this breakdown of 517 prisoners at Guantanamo based on Social Science Research Network analysis of recently released DoD data:
    • al-Qaeda fighters only made up 8% of prisoners.
    • Only 5% of prisoners were captured on the battlefield.
    • 86% of the prisoners were captured by either Pakistan or the Northern Alliance and turned over to US custody for payment of large bounties.
    • The article also notes that as of July 2006, 75% of the prisoners were no longer being interrogated.
  • The Common Good and the Land by T. Christopher Cornell – A reflection on the possibilities of intensive natural agriculture. Notes that for the past two years, Peter Maurin Farm has given 6,000 pounds of fresh, usable produce to friends, visitors, local soup kitchens and CW houses in the city. For more on intensive agriculture, the author recommends the Sheep Ranch Catholic Worker’s new publication, 21st Century Agitator. Contact Chris Montesano, Box 53, Sheep Ranch, CA 95250. This article mentions the following books:
  • Blanket Appeal by Editors – An appeal for blankets to be brought to the New York Catholic Worker House. Contact information in “Subscription” section below. I’d recommend you contact them before sending any blankets.
  • House List Update by Editors – A list of CW houses that have either changed address, just formed or have closed. Full contact information in the paper. If you’d like addresses and can’t find a copy of the Dec 2006 CW, please e-mail me and I’ll get the address for you if I haven’t lost my paper.
    • Changed Address
      • Sacramento CW
      • Oakland CW
    • New Houses
      • St. Joseph’s – Troy, OH
      • St. Patrick’s Kitchen – Troy, OH
      • St. Francis House – New London, CT
      • Stevensville CW Farm – Stevensville, MT
      • Omaha Catholic Worker – Omaha, NE
      • Promised Land CW Farm – Christchurch, New Zealand
    • Closed Houses
      • John Filligar CW Farm – Pence Springs, WV
      • Mary Harris CW – Washington DC
      • Llewellyn Scott House – Washington DC
  • Nuclear North Dakota by Carmen Trotta – Describes outcome of Plowshares action against a nuclear silo in North Dakota in 2006. Notes US non-compliance with Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and suggests that a nuclear strike on the United States within a decade is possible.
  • Labor Letter by George Albertz – An appeal to locate current or former ACLU lawyer Ed McGuire who helped out Hubert Albertz in his “fight to clean up SEIU Local 32E.” Appeal is made by son George Albertz. No contact information provided other than “Bruderhof community in Harlem” If you know where to find Mr. McGuire, please try to contact Mr. Albertz through the New York Catholic Worker House.
  • Catonsville Film by Bill Griffin – Favorable review of the movie Investigation of a Flame: A Documentary Portrait of the Catonsville Nine. This film can be purchased from First Run/Icarus Films, 32 Court Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201, 718-488-8900 and 800-876-1710. “All proceeds are being donated to the Viva House Catholic Worker in Baltimore.”
  • Build the City of God by Jim Reagan – A reflection on Advent that also talks about the high cost of New York housing.
  • Sr. Mary Luke Tobin, R. I. P. by Bill Ofenloch – Obituary of a nun who was one of 15 women invited to participate in Vatican II. “She spoke and wrote tirelessly on peace and social justice issues, for women’s rights and against war and preparations for war. She picketed with the United Farmworkers, was arrested and jailed for protesting the Vietnam War, played a major role in the ecumenical movement, and was an adviser to the Women’s Ordination Movement. She was also a ballet dancer!”
  • Book Review – Peacework: Prayer, Resistance, Community by Henri Nouwen, Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY, 2005 Reviewed by Grace Yukich – Favorable review of a book that asserts that peacemaking is impossible without prayer, resistance and community. Each aspect feeds the others, but prayer is considered the most important. Saying “yes” to live is as important as saying “NO!” to violence and death.
  • Book Review – The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions by Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ Vintage Books, New York, 2005 Reviewed by Bill Griffin – Favorable review of a book written by long-time pro-life activist Sister Helen Prejean. Article asserts that one hundred two three death row inmates have been exonerated through the use of DNA evidence since the death penalty was reintroduced in 1977. A podcast of an author interview is available.

     

    ———————

    As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

     

    1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

     

    2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

    Phil Runkel
    Archivist
    Department of Special Collections and University Archives
    Raynor Memorial Libraries
    Marquette University
    1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
    Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
    414-288-5903
    http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

    3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

     

    To Subscribe:

     

    Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

     

    Send your subscription requests to:

    Catholic Worker
    36 East 1st St.
    New York, NY 10003
    Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

     

    Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.