Archive for the ‘immigration’ Category

January/February 2009

February 15, 2009

The following articles appeared in the January/February 2009 issue of the New York based Catholic Worker. Any web links below are to related materials on the web and not to the Catholic Worker.

  • To Welcome the Stranger by Jim Reagan – Commentary on our harsh immigration laws that break families apart. Refers to plights of RoxRoy Salmon and Jean Montrevil. Refers to the seemingly dead Child Citizen Protection Act and notes that about 280,000 immigrants are currently being detained by ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement)
  • Prisons Beyond  Guantanamo by Matt Vogel – An article that reminds readers that there is a whole host of overseas US prisons where human rights have been violated and those are just the prisons we know about. References Bagram in Afghanistan, Camp Bucca and Camp Cropper in Iraq, as well as suspected prisons in Eastern Europe and Diego Garcia.
  • A Tragedy in Bushwick by Felton Davis – Chronicles the positive response of a community in the face of two brothers beaten (one to death) in Brooklyn either for walking arm in arm and/or daring to be immigrants. Deceased was Jose Sucuzhanay.
  • St. Pat’s in Miyako (Okinawa, Japan) by Pat Sullivan, OFM Cap – An account of the 50th anniversary of the founding of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Miyako.
  • Prophetic Voices Never Die by Louie Vitale, OFM – A reflection on how the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on war and poverty are applicable today.
  • My Sojourn at the NYCW by Francisco Fernandez – A recollection of his experiences at Catholic Worker houses back in the 1950s and his experience with US immigration authorities.
  • Book Review: Army of None by Aimee Allison and David Solnit. Seven Stories Press, New York, NY 2007. Reviewed by Fr. Bill Pickard. – Favorable review of book aiming to dry up pools of military applicants through “truth in recruiting” and building other opportunities for young people.  Asserts that only 6% of recruits get the bonuses promised to them. [Daniel’s note – If someone can either document that number or some other number, let me know and I’ll update this entry.]
  • Beds Taken by Bureaucracy by Tanya Theriault – Relates the struggles of faith-based homeless shelters to comply with New York City rules for aid. References New York Partnership for the Homeless and Coalition for the Homeless. Notes the dangers of faith-based organizations relying on government for assistance.
  • Book Review: The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism by Andrew J. Bacevich. Metropolitan Books, Henry Holt and Company, New York, 2008. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of book asserting that America is deeply threatened by consumerism, addiction to foreign oil and above all, a belief that we are divinely ordained to rule the world.
  • Cluster Bombs: No! by Bill Griffin – An exhortation for the United States to sign the Convention on Cluster Munitions. References Travis Bradach-Nall, an American serviceman killed by US cluster munitions in July 2003 and a GAO report about US casualties from US mines and unexploded ordinance. Report appears to be Information on U.S. Use of Land Mines in the Persian Gulf War GAO-02-1003 (September 2002).
  • Chrystie Street by Edgar Forand – A reprint from the May 1963 Catholic Worker detailing the joys and many challenges of life in the Chrystie Street Catholic Worker House, including dealing with drug-addicted young people and getting fresh produce from convents.
  • Friendship in Community by Ted Walker – Reflections on his brief but uplifting friendship with the 91 year old Edgar Forand. Includes reflections on the need for quiet time and how relationships get formed.

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As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

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Oct/Nov 2008: Abbreviated

January 31, 2009

On the principle that something is better than nothing at all, this month’s digest will once again be a simple listing of titles and authors. This is for the October/November 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker.

Any hyperlinks below are to related information on the web and not to the article in the paper.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Aug/Sep 2008: Abbreviated

January 24, 2009
A special note to Malfred, who is watching the CW Book List on WorldCat: This list isn’t going to change. If you want to watch a list for changes, please start watching http://www.worldcat.org/profiles/CatholicWorkerDigest/lists/499969 instead. This is the list that will be updated with items mentioned in future issues of the Catholic Worker.
———————–

On the principle that something is better than nothing at all, this month’s digest will once again be a simple listing of titles and authors of stories appearing in the Aug/Sept 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker.

Any hyperlinks below are to related information on the web and not to the article in the paper.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

January/February 2008

April 6, 2008

The January-February 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Desert Death for Immigrants by Sarah Brook – Describes the often racist opposition to today’s immigrants. Focuses on Arizona and Phoenix.
  • Gordon Zahn 1918-2007 by Michael W. Hovey – Obituary of lifelong pacificist who died on December 9, 2007 from complications of Alzheimer’s disease in a nursing home outside Milwaukee WI. Zahn was an author as well as an activists and his works can be located at http://worldcat.org/search?q=gordon+charles+zahn&qt=facetNavigation&sd=desc.
  • Justice is Served! by Bill Griffin – Announcement of a service sector union campaign called Justice Will be Served! For more information, please contact Justice Will be Served! Campaign c/o National Mobilization Against Sweatshops PO Box 130293, NY NY 10013, (212) 334-2333/
  • Good News vs. Death Penalty by Art Laffin and Matt Vogel – Two brief items under the same title. Art Laffin describes his participation in the Cities of Life Campaign while in Rome. Mr. Laffin is a member of a murder victim’s family who opposes the death penalty. Matt Vogel describes how New Jersey has officially abandoned the death penalty.
  • Memories of Camp Warner by Gordon Zahn – An excerpt from the CW, Oct-Nov 1977. Camp Warner was a detention camp in New Hamshire for Catholic conscientious objectors during WWII. The article commemorated the opening of the camp in 1942.
  • Blessed Franz, Resister Saint by Bruce Kent – Reflections on the life of Franz Jagerstatter, which has affected people as far away as Turkey. Proposes his life as an example of how to say now to today’s culture of death and consumerism.
  • Sammantha, R.I.P. by Matt Daloisio – Relates the story of a veteran who committed suicide. Article notes that at least 6,256 US veterans committed suicide in 2005.
  • First Casualty of War by Bill Griffin – Summary of media accounts and leaked memos that suggest that torture is still being practiced by the CIA and other agencies under the cover of the “war on terror”.
  • One Way to Support Peace by Stanley Bohn – Supports tax resistance as a way to stop the occupation of Iraq. Also describes HR 1921, the Freedom of Religion Peace Tax Fund, which would make redirection of taxes by conscientious objectors to war legal.
  • The Bishop & the Dam by Matt Vogel – Continuing coverage of the ongoing efforts of Bishop Luiz Flavio Cappio and residents of the Brazillian state of Bahia to stop the damming and division of the Sao Francisco River. Bishop Cappio stopped his most recent hunger strike after 24 days on December 20, 2007.
  • Book Review: The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil. By Philip Zimbardo. Random House, New York, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable Review of an account of the notorious Stanford Prison Experiment of 1971 and its spooky similarity to what happened at Abu Gharib. Shows how the gov’t could have knowingly created an environment likely to result in torture w/o having to give specific orders for mistreatment.
  • Book Review: Fear Up Harsh: An Army Interrogator’s Dark Journey Through Iraq. By Tony Lagouranis with Allan Mikaelian. New American Library, New York, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of the story of an admitted US torturer in Iraq. Book relates toll torture takes on perpetrator as well as victim. Relates Spc Lagouranis eventual conversion and whistleblowing.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

December 2007

January 30, 2008

The December 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Deportations and Families by Members of the New Sanctuary Movement – Two concrete examples of how current immigration policies are anti-family.
  • Between Iraq and Jordan by Cathy Breen – Three letters detailing troubles of Iraqi refugees in Jordan and Syria. Highlights Syria’s relative generosity and describes a visit to the monastery of St. Moses the Abyssinian.
  • Maryhouse by Amanda W. Daloisio – Reflections on gratitude. Mentions Teresa of Avila, Wendell Berry, Kathy Kelly, and St. Therese of Lisieux.
  • Christ’s Peace is Our Work by Jim Reagan – Reflections on the Christian obligation for peacemaking. Notes that the proportion of civilians among those killed or wounded in war has risen from 5% in World War I to 75% in today’s conflicts. Expresses opinion that war doesn’t simply halt the Corporal Works of Mercy, but actually reverses them.
  • Education on the Inside by Sammy Moore – Excerpt from a speech presented to the New Jersey State NAACP Convention on September 22, 2007 by the president of the NJ NAACP prison chapter president. Mr. Moore is currently serving 40 years to life. He describes his efforts to become educated, the difficulties prisoners have in becoming educated and the moral practical benefits of educating prisoners. Briefly describes the work of the NAACP Prison Project.
  • Mohammed Eausack, 1926-2007 by Matt Vogel – Obituary of a sick Muslim elder who came to the NY Catholic Worker house via his doctor at a homeless shelter. Described as gentle and witty, Mr. Eausack was a “great symbol of stubborn strength for many in the house. Though he slowed, he never really stopped fighting, struggling to get through the day.”
  • Pizza Resistance by Matt Vogel – Relates the store of resistance against the death penalty and hunger inspired by Death Row inmate Philip Workman‘s request that a homeless person be given a vegetarian pizza in lieu of Workman’s last meal.
  • An Italian Christmas Tale by Jack Cook – A retelling of the legend of La Befana, a woman who searches for her dead son and recognizes him in the baby Jesus.
  • Book Review: A Power Governments Cannot Suppress. By Howard Zinn. City Lights Books, San Francisco, CA 2007. Reviewed by Gene Roman. – Favorable Review of a compilation of essays Zinn wrote for The Progressive. The article says that Zinn “digs through the archives of American history to shine a bright light on union struggles for a decent wage, religious resistance to war and the policies of US Presidents from George Washington to George W. Bush.”
  • Book Review: People Power: Fifty Peacemakers and Their Communities. By Michael True. Rawat Publications, Jaipur, India, 2007. Reviewed by Jane Sammon. – Favorable review of a book profiling Thomas Merton, Howard Zinn, Delores Huerta, Adin Ballou, and Abigail Kelly, among others.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.