Archive for the ‘prisoners’ Category

January/February 2008

April 6, 2008

The January-February 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Desert Death for Immigrants by Sarah Brook – Describes the often racist opposition to today’s immigrants. Focuses on Arizona and Phoenix.
  • Gordon Zahn 1918-2007 by Michael W. Hovey – Obituary of lifelong pacificist who died on December 9, 2007 from complications of Alzheimer’s disease in a nursing home outside Milwaukee WI. Zahn was an author as well as an activists and his works can be located at http://worldcat.org/search?q=gordon+charles+zahn&qt=facetNavigation&sd=desc.
  • Justice is Served! by Bill Griffin – Announcement of a service sector union campaign called Justice Will be Served! For more information, please contact Justice Will be Served! Campaign c/o National Mobilization Against Sweatshops PO Box 130293, NY NY 10013, (212) 334-2333/
  • Good News vs. Death Penalty by Art Laffin and Matt Vogel – Two brief items under the same title. Art Laffin describes his participation in the Cities of Life Campaign while in Rome. Mr. Laffin is a member of a murder victim’s family who opposes the death penalty. Matt Vogel describes how New Jersey has officially abandoned the death penalty.
  • Memories of Camp Warner by Gordon Zahn – An excerpt from the CW, Oct-Nov 1977. Camp Warner was a detention camp in New Hamshire for Catholic conscientious objectors during WWII. The article commemorated the opening of the camp in 1942.
  • Blessed Franz, Resister Saint by Bruce Kent – Reflections on the life of Franz Jagerstatter, which has affected people as far away as Turkey. Proposes his life as an example of how to say now to today’s culture of death and consumerism.
  • Sammantha, R.I.P. by Matt Daloisio – Relates the story of a veteran who committed suicide. Article notes that at least 6,256 US veterans committed suicide in 2005.
  • First Casualty of War by Bill Griffin – Summary of media accounts and leaked memos that suggest that torture is still being practiced by the CIA and other agencies under the cover of the “war on terror”.
  • One Way to Support Peace by Stanley Bohn – Supports tax resistance as a way to stop the occupation of Iraq. Also describes HR 1921, the Freedom of Religion Peace Tax Fund, which would make redirection of taxes by conscientious objectors to war legal.
  • The Bishop & the Dam by Matt Vogel – Continuing coverage of the ongoing efforts of Bishop Luiz Flavio Cappio and residents of the Brazillian state of Bahia to stop the damming and division of the Sao Francisco River. Bishop Cappio stopped his most recent hunger strike after 24 days on December 20, 2007.
  • Book Review: The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil. By Philip Zimbardo. Random House, New York, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable Review of an account of the notorious Stanford Prison Experiment of 1971 and its spooky similarity to what happened at Abu Gharib. Shows how the gov’t could have knowingly created an environment likely to result in torture w/o having to give specific orders for mistreatment.
  • Book Review: Fear Up Harsh: An Army Interrogator’s Dark Journey Through Iraq. By Tony Lagouranis with Allan Mikaelian. New American Library, New York, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of the story of an admitted US torturer in Iraq. Book relates toll torture takes on perpetrator as well as victim. Relates Spc Lagouranis eventual conversion and whistleblowing.

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As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

December 2007

January 30, 2008

The December 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Deportations and Families by Members of the New Sanctuary Movement – Two concrete examples of how current immigration policies are anti-family.
  • Between Iraq and Jordan by Cathy Breen – Three letters detailing troubles of Iraqi refugees in Jordan and Syria. Highlights Syria’s relative generosity and describes a visit to the monastery of St. Moses the Abyssinian.
  • Maryhouse by Amanda W. Daloisio – Reflections on gratitude. Mentions Teresa of Avila, Wendell Berry, Kathy Kelly, and St. Therese of Lisieux.
  • Christ’s Peace is Our Work by Jim Reagan – Reflections on the Christian obligation for peacemaking. Notes that the proportion of civilians among those killed or wounded in war has risen from 5% in World War I to 75% in today’s conflicts. Expresses opinion that war doesn’t simply halt the Corporal Works of Mercy, but actually reverses them.
  • Education on the Inside by Sammy Moore – Excerpt from a speech presented to the New Jersey State NAACP Convention on September 22, 2007 by the president of the NJ NAACP prison chapter president. Mr. Moore is currently serving 40 years to life. He describes his efforts to become educated, the difficulties prisoners have in becoming educated and the moral practical benefits of educating prisoners. Briefly describes the work of the NAACP Prison Project.
  • Mohammed Eausack, 1926-2007 by Matt Vogel – Obituary of a sick Muslim elder who came to the NY Catholic Worker house via his doctor at a homeless shelter. Described as gentle and witty, Mr. Eausack was a “great symbol of stubborn strength for many in the house. Though he slowed, he never really stopped fighting, struggling to get through the day.”
  • Pizza Resistance by Matt Vogel – Relates the store of resistance against the death penalty and hunger inspired by Death Row inmate Philip Workman‘s request that a homeless person be given a vegetarian pizza in lieu of Workman’s last meal.
  • An Italian Christmas Tale by Jack Cook – A retelling of the legend of La Befana, a woman who searches for her dead son and recognizes him in the baby Jesus.
  • Book Review: A Power Governments Cannot Suppress. By Howard Zinn. City Lights Books, San Francisco, CA 2007. Reviewed by Gene Roman. – Favorable Review of a compilation of essays Zinn wrote for The Progressive. The article says that Zinn “digs through the archives of American history to shine a bright light on union struggles for a decent wage, religious resistance to war and the policies of US Presidents from George Washington to George W. Bush.”
  • Book Review: People Power: Fifty Peacemakers and Their Communities. By Michael True. Rawat Publications, Jaipur, India, 2007. Reviewed by Jane Sammon. – Favorable review of a book profiling Thomas Merton, Howard Zinn, Delores Huerta, Adin Ballou, and Abigail Kelly, among others.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

October/November 2007

November 3, 2007

The October/November 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Divinity Here and Now by Dorothy Day – Reprint of 1949 article reflecting on how motherhood brings a person out of themselves and provides faith life will continue. Also reflects on every Christian’s call to sainthood.
  • Recommendation & Request by Jim Forest and Robert Ellsberg – Jim Forest recommends the DVD version of the Dorothy Day biographical play Fool for Christ. Robert Ellsberg is beginning to collect and edit the letters of Dorothy Day. If you have some letters or know who does, please contact Robert Ellsberg at at Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY 10545.
  • In Human Terms by Bill Griffin – Commends the work of Ha’aretz columnist Amira Hass for humanizing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • CIW & Prison Phone Updates by Matt Vogel – These two short articles celebrate victories for justice. The Coalition of Immokale Workers, a Florida-based agricultural union convinced McDonald’s to pay growers an extra penny a pound for tomatoes. This agreement also raises workers wages and improves working conditions. In a separate update, the State of New York has agree to stop profiting from inmate phone cards. Work to get other states to follow suit is being undertaken by the Center for Constitutional Rights.
  • Torture on Trial in Arizona by Bill Quigley – Account of the ongoing trial of Fransican Fr. Louis Vitale and Jesuit Fr. Stephen Kelly for attempting to deliver a protest letter to the Fr. Huachuca office of Major General Barbara Fast. Article touches on incidents of US torture and the suicide of Abu Gharib interrogator Army Specialist Alyssa R. Peterson. According to the article, the outcome of the trial will not affect November 2007 protests planned for Ft. Huachuca. For information about the trial or the November protest, contact Jack or Felice Cohen-Joppa at 520-323-8697. Daniel’s Note: according to the group Pace e Bene, the two priests have been given a five month prison sentence.
  • Remember, Respond, Resist by Tanya Theriault – Accounts of remembrance and resistance relating to the American atomic bombings of WWII and our current occupation of Iraq.
  • Wrenched from My Heart by John Pitts Corry – A reflection on our obligations to the poor and how we in the West are all rich because we have shones.
  • Cardinal Lustiger, 1926-2007 by Bill Griffin – Obituary for Jewish convert and conservative French Catholic Bishop. Description of the complexity of his life and work and of his role in reconciling Catholics and Jews.
  • Beth Rogers, 1919-2007 by Felton Davis – Obituary of a long-time Catholic Worker and senior circulation manager. Has a number of reflections from the 1940s/1950s.
  • Grace Paley by Dan Mauk – Brief death notice and tribute to Grace by someone saved from a police beating by her vigilence.
  • Blessed Franz! by Jane Sammon – A celebration of the beatification of Franz Jagerstatter, German draft resister who rejected idolatory of the State. Suggests Jagerstatter as a patron for today’s objectors.
  • Book Review: Into the Silent Land: A Guide to the Christian Practice of Contemplation. By Martin Laird, OSA. Oxford University Press New York 2006. Reviewed by Robert Trabold. – Favorable review of a guide to contemplative prayer.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Apr/May 2007

April 29, 2007

The March/April 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Just Phone Rates in Jail by Matt Vogel – Article explores the extremely high phone rates most families have to pay to speak to incarcerated loved ones and the negative effect this has on rehabilitation. Commends New York for giving up its kickback from the phone company it gave a prison monopoly to.
  • Anger Grows in City Streets by Chris Zimmerman – Describes angry neighborhood reaction to police shooting of Timur Pearson. Describes New Black Panther Party incitement to “put some fear into the system.” [Daniel’s Note – The CW does NOT endorse the BPP’s methods or most of its platform.]
  • Iraqis Face New Sorrow by Cathy Breen – Letters from Jordan about Iraqi Refuges and the Iraqi government’s decision to issue new passports and force refugees to return to Baghdad to get them. Letters describe deteriorating conditions for refugees in Jordan and faults US and Britain for unwillingness to take refugees their war created.
  • Spring Appeal by Editors – The Catholic Worker needs your help! Please send your NON-tax-deductible contribution to the address listed under “subscriptions.” Any amount will help them.
  • Peter Maurin Farm by Else M. Dowdy – A reflection on the last years of Theodore Rooselvet Ridlon, long time CW resident.
  • Five Years Too Long! by Matthew W. Daloisio – Describes continuing protests against the Guantanamo Bay prison run by the United States. Describes efforts to bring the names of detainees into federal courts. Mentions group Witness Against Torture. To bring a speaker to your community or for more information on the Campaign to Shut Down Guantanamo, please contact Matthew W. Daloisio, 55 E. 3rd Street, NY, NY, 10003, (201) 264-4424.
  • Theodore Rooselvet Ridlon, Our “Slim” by Tom Cornell – A tribute to the life of long time Catholic Worker and walker. His origins were shrouded in mystery, but he was kind to all.
  • Death Penalty Review Raise Questions by Alice and Staughton Lynd and Bill Griffin – Reaction and dialog to book review of Death of Innocents in the December 2006 Catholic Worker.
  • Abbe Pierre, R.I.P. by Bill Griffin – Obituary of French Resistance member and later homeless activist Fr. Henri Groues. Abbe Pierre was the founder of the Emmaus Community.
  • Sr. Ruth Heaney, OSB by Rosalie Reigle – Obituary of a Catholic Worker pioneer and prisoner advocate who kept active through her 80s. She received several awards in her lifetime, including the Elaine Aber Humanitarian Award from the Missouri Association for Social Welfare and the papal award Pro Ecclesia et Pontiface. She was married with six children before becoming a nun.
  • More on Ruth Heaney by Cyril Echele – Recollection of Sr. Ruth Heaney by a friend of many years.
  • Memories of Bishop Proano by Joseph E. Mulligan, SJ – Reflections on the prophetic life of Ecuadorian bishop Leonidas Proano, the “bishop of the Indians” with special attention to his work in the 1970s and persecution by Ecuadorian authorities.
  • Book Review – The Call to Discernment in Troubled Times: New Perspectives on the Transformative Wisdom of Ignatius of Loyola by Dean Brackley, SJ , Crossroads Publishing, New York, 2004 Reviewed by Gail M. Presbey. – Mostly favorable review of a new look at St. Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises. Notes author provides three requirements to keep in touch with reality – 1) Let the reality of suffering reach us; 2) undergo personal transformation; and 3) seek wisdom in community.
  • Book Review – To Wisdom Through Failure: A Journey of Compassion, Resistance and Hope. by Larry Rosebaugh, OMI. EPICA, Washington, DC, 2006 Reviewed by Karl Meyer – Favorable review of missionary and peace activist Fr. Larry Rosebaugh. Stories of work in Guatemala, Mexico, El Salvador and while imprisoned.

 

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As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

 

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

 

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

 

To Subscribe:

 

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

 

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

 

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Jan/Feb 2007: Poem from Gitmo

March 1, 2007

Because people held at Guantanamo Bay rarely get to speak in their own words, I am reproducing the poem written by Usama Abu Kabir and printed by the Catholic Worker in the Jan/Feb 2007 issue.

Is it true that the grass
grows again after rain?
Is it true that the flowers
will rise up in the spring?
Is it true that birds
will migrate home again?
Is it true that the salmon
swim back up their stream?

Is it true. This is true. These are all miracles.
But is it true that one day
we’ll leave Guantanamo Bay?
Is it true that one day
we’ll go back to our homes?
I sail in my dreams, I am dreaming of home.

To be with my children, each one part of me;
To be with my wife, and the ones that I love;
To be with my parents,
my world’s tenderest hearts.
I dream to be home, to be free of this cage.

But do you hear me, O Judge,
do you hear me at all?
We are innocent, here,
we’ve committed no crime.
Set me free, set us free, if anywhere still
May justice, compassion
remain in this world!

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To those who want to turn their backs on Mr. Abu Kabir, I repeat this information from the December 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker:

  • Shut Down Guantanamo! by Frida Berrigan & Matthew W. Daloisio – An account of the work done by legal, medical and social groups in 2006 to try and close down the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Article offers this breakdown of 517 prisoners at Guantanamo based on Social Science Research Network analysis of recently released DoD data:
    • al-Qaeda fighters only made up 8% of prisoners.
    • Only 5% of prisoners were captured on the battlefield.
    • 86% of the prisoners were captured by either Pakistan or the Northern Alliance and turned over to US custody for payment of large bounties.
    • The article also notes that as of July 2006, 75% of the prisoners were no longer being interrogated.

Is Mr. Abu Kabir innocent? I don’t know, but the odds look good.

Charge and offer a truly fair trial or release the prisoners. Shut down the prison. Shut down the base. Return to our professed values. Let us re-earn the right to issue human rights reports with a straight face.

October / November 2004

November 19, 2006

The following articles were carried in the October/November 2004 issue of the Catholic Worker, which is NOT available on the Internet:

  • Light of Conscience – Prison Testimony of Voices in the Wilderness member Kathy Kelly.
  • Love Casts Out Fear – Dorothy Day reprint from February 1960. Makes mention of Thomas Merton.
  • Saints for us Sinners – Brief sketches of October and November saints.
  • Be All That You Can Be? – Reflections on the the draft and conscientious objection.
  • We Parched Desert Travellers – Descriptions of antiwar protests.
  • Jane Kesel, 1921-2004 – Obituary of a long term CW house resident.
  • Czeslaw Milosz, 1911-2004 – Obituary of award winning Polish poet who warned of threats to freedom from both Communism and consumerism.
  • Sustainable Soup – Reflections on organic vs. factory farming.

If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have two suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

August / September 2004

November 19, 2006

Like nearly 58,000 other people in this country, I subscribe to Catholic Worker, a newspaper founded by Dorothy Day back in the 1920s. Catholic Worker carries stories on peace and justice issues from a Catholic and personalist perspective. Unlike so much else in this world, Catholic Worker is not available electronically, and so might escape the notice of many in the Internet community.

I’d like to change that, within the bounds of copyright and fair use, so today I launch “Catholic Worker Digest”, a listing of articles appearing in each issue of Catholic Worker. Catholic Worker is issued seven times a year. My first three issues will appear over the next three weeks, because I started with the Aug-Sept 2004 issue, which I had laying around the house. Suggestions for obtaining full text of Catholic Worker articles and subscription information appear at the end of the digest.

Articles contained in the Aug/Sept 2004 Catholic Worker:

  • Solidarity and Suffering – Interview with Pat Rice on human rights work.
  • Methods of Tyranny – Review of American detention and interrogation methods in the War on Terror.
  • I am an Ordinary Man – Brief profile of Israeli nuclear whistleblower Mordechai Vanunu.
  • Another path of resistance – Profile of US deserter Jeremy Hinzman. Contains tidbits of Basic Training methods as perceived by Mr. Hinzman.
  • Anarchist Christians – Debate about whether there is such a thing as a Christian anarchist.
  • David Dellinger 1915-2004 – Obituary of peace and justice activist David Dellinger.
  • Book Review of Capital Homesteading for Every Citizen by Norman G. Kurland.
  • Book Review of Fear Anger & Failure: A Chronicle of the Bush Administration’s War against Terror from the attacks of 9/11/2001 to defeat in Baghdad by William Pfaff.
  • Mattie Robinson, 1943-2004 – Obituary of long time CW house resident.
  • Ed Marciniak 1918-2004 – Obituary of a Chicago Catholic Worker House founder.

If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have two suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.