Archive for the ‘torture’ Category

January/February 2009

February 15, 2009

The following articles appeared in the January/February 2009 issue of the New York based Catholic Worker. Any web links below are to related materials on the web and not to the Catholic Worker.

  • To Welcome the Stranger by Jim Reagan – Commentary on our harsh immigration laws that break families apart. Refers to plights of RoxRoy Salmon and Jean Montrevil. Refers to the seemingly dead Child Citizen Protection Act and notes that about 280,000 immigrants are currently being detained by ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement)
  • Prisons Beyond  Guantanamo by Matt Vogel – An article that reminds readers that there is a whole host of overseas US prisons where human rights have been violated and those are just the prisons we know about. References Bagram in Afghanistan, Camp Bucca and Camp Cropper in Iraq, as well as suspected prisons in Eastern Europe and Diego Garcia.
  • A Tragedy in Bushwick by Felton Davis – Chronicles the positive response of a community in the face of two brothers beaten (one to death) in Brooklyn either for walking arm in arm and/or daring to be immigrants. Deceased was Jose Sucuzhanay.
  • St. Pat’s in Miyako (Okinawa, Japan) by Pat Sullivan, OFM Cap – An account of the 50th anniversary of the founding of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Miyako.
  • Prophetic Voices Never Die by Louie Vitale, OFM – A reflection on how the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on war and poverty are applicable today.
  • My Sojourn at the NYCW by Francisco Fernandez – A recollection of his experiences at Catholic Worker houses back in the 1950s and his experience with US immigration authorities.
  • Book Review: Army of None by Aimee Allison and David Solnit. Seven Stories Press, New York, NY 2007. Reviewed by Fr. Bill Pickard. – Favorable review of book aiming to dry up pools of military applicants through “truth in recruiting” and building other opportunities for young people.  Asserts that only 6% of recruits get the bonuses promised to them. [Daniel’s note – If someone can either document that number or some other number, let me know and I’ll update this entry.]
  • Beds Taken by Bureaucracy by Tanya Theriault – Relates the struggles of faith-based homeless shelters to comply with New York City rules for aid. References New York Partnership for the Homeless and Coalition for the Homeless. Notes the dangers of faith-based organizations relying on government for assistance.
  • Book Review: The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism by Andrew J. Bacevich. Metropolitan Books, Henry Holt and Company, New York, 2008. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of book asserting that America is deeply threatened by consumerism, addiction to foreign oil and above all, a belief that we are divinely ordained to rule the world.
  • Cluster Bombs: No! by Bill Griffin – An exhortation for the United States to sign the Convention on Cluster Munitions. References Travis Bradach-Nall, an American serviceman killed by US cluster munitions in July 2003 and a GAO report about US casualties from US mines and unexploded ordinance. Report appears to be Information on U.S. Use of Land Mines in the Persian Gulf War GAO-02-1003 (September 2002).
  • Chrystie Street by Edgar Forand – A reprint from the May 1963 Catholic Worker detailing the joys and many challenges of life in the Chrystie Street Catholic Worker House, including dealing with drug-addicted young people and getting fresh produce from convents.
  • Friendship in Community by Ted Walker – Reflections on his brief but uplifting friendship with the 91 year old Edgar Forand. Includes reflections on the need for quiet time and how relationships get formed.

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As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

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March/April 2008 – Abbreviated

June 22, 2008

On the principle that something is better than nothing at all, this month’s digest will be a simple listing of titles and authors of stories appearing in the March/April 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker. Any hyperlinks below are to related information on the web and not to the article in the paper.

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As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

January/February 2008

April 6, 2008

The January-February 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Desert Death for Immigrants by Sarah Brook – Describes the often racist opposition to today’s immigrants. Focuses on Arizona and Phoenix.
  • Gordon Zahn 1918-2007 by Michael W. Hovey – Obituary of lifelong pacificist who died on December 9, 2007 from complications of Alzheimer’s disease in a nursing home outside Milwaukee WI. Zahn was an author as well as an activists and his works can be located at http://worldcat.org/search?q=gordon+charles+zahn&qt=facetNavigation&sd=desc.
  • Justice is Served! by Bill Griffin – Announcement of a service sector union campaign called Justice Will be Served! For more information, please contact Justice Will be Served! Campaign c/o National Mobilization Against Sweatshops PO Box 130293, NY NY 10013, (212) 334-2333/
  • Good News vs. Death Penalty by Art Laffin and Matt Vogel – Two brief items under the same title. Art Laffin describes his participation in the Cities of Life Campaign while in Rome. Mr. Laffin is a member of a murder victim’s family who opposes the death penalty. Matt Vogel describes how New Jersey has officially abandoned the death penalty.
  • Memories of Camp Warner by Gordon Zahn – An excerpt from the CW, Oct-Nov 1977. Camp Warner was a detention camp in New Hamshire for Catholic conscientious objectors during WWII. The article commemorated the opening of the camp in 1942.
  • Blessed Franz, Resister Saint by Bruce Kent – Reflections on the life of Franz Jagerstatter, which has affected people as far away as Turkey. Proposes his life as an example of how to say now to today’s culture of death and consumerism.
  • Sammantha, R.I.P. by Matt Daloisio – Relates the story of a veteran who committed suicide. Article notes that at least 6,256 US veterans committed suicide in 2005.
  • First Casualty of War by Bill Griffin – Summary of media accounts and leaked memos that suggest that torture is still being practiced by the CIA and other agencies under the cover of the “war on terror”.
  • One Way to Support Peace by Stanley Bohn – Supports tax resistance as a way to stop the occupation of Iraq. Also describes HR 1921, the Freedom of Religion Peace Tax Fund, which would make redirection of taxes by conscientious objectors to war legal.
  • The Bishop & the Dam by Matt Vogel – Continuing coverage of the ongoing efforts of Bishop Luiz Flavio Cappio and residents of the Brazillian state of Bahia to stop the damming and division of the Sao Francisco River. Bishop Cappio stopped his most recent hunger strike after 24 days on December 20, 2007.
  • Book Review: The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil. By Philip Zimbardo. Random House, New York, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable Review of an account of the notorious Stanford Prison Experiment of 1971 and its spooky similarity to what happened at Abu Gharib. Shows how the gov’t could have knowingly created an environment likely to result in torture w/o having to give specific orders for mistreatment.
  • Book Review: Fear Up Harsh: An Army Interrogator’s Dark Journey Through Iraq. By Tony Lagouranis with Allan Mikaelian. New American Library, New York, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of the story of an admitted US torturer in Iraq. Book relates toll torture takes on perpetrator as well as victim. Relates Spc Lagouranis eventual conversion and whistleblowing.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

October/November 2007

November 3, 2007

The October/November 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Divinity Here and Now by Dorothy Day – Reprint of 1949 article reflecting on how motherhood brings a person out of themselves and provides faith life will continue. Also reflects on every Christian’s call to sainthood.
  • Recommendation & Request by Jim Forest and Robert Ellsberg – Jim Forest recommends the DVD version of the Dorothy Day biographical play Fool for Christ. Robert Ellsberg is beginning to collect and edit the letters of Dorothy Day. If you have some letters or know who does, please contact Robert Ellsberg at at Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY 10545.
  • In Human Terms by Bill Griffin – Commends the work of Ha’aretz columnist Amira Hass for humanizing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • CIW & Prison Phone Updates by Matt Vogel – These two short articles celebrate victories for justice. The Coalition of Immokale Workers, a Florida-based agricultural union convinced McDonald’s to pay growers an extra penny a pound for tomatoes. This agreement also raises workers wages and improves working conditions. In a separate update, the State of New York has agree to stop profiting from inmate phone cards. Work to get other states to follow suit is being undertaken by the Center for Constitutional Rights.
  • Torture on Trial in Arizona by Bill Quigley – Account of the ongoing trial of Fransican Fr. Louis Vitale and Jesuit Fr. Stephen Kelly for attempting to deliver a protest letter to the Fr. Huachuca office of Major General Barbara Fast. Article touches on incidents of US torture and the suicide of Abu Gharib interrogator Army Specialist Alyssa R. Peterson. According to the article, the outcome of the trial will not affect November 2007 protests planned for Ft. Huachuca. For information about the trial or the November protest, contact Jack or Felice Cohen-Joppa at 520-323-8697. Daniel’s Note: according to the group Pace e Bene, the two priests have been given a five month prison sentence.
  • Remember, Respond, Resist by Tanya Theriault – Accounts of remembrance and resistance relating to the American atomic bombings of WWII and our current occupation of Iraq.
  • Wrenched from My Heart by John Pitts Corry – A reflection on our obligations to the poor and how we in the West are all rich because we have shones.
  • Cardinal Lustiger, 1926-2007 by Bill Griffin – Obituary for Jewish convert and conservative French Catholic Bishop. Description of the complexity of his life and work and of his role in reconciling Catholics and Jews.
  • Beth Rogers, 1919-2007 by Felton Davis – Obituary of a long-time Catholic Worker and senior circulation manager. Has a number of reflections from the 1940s/1950s.
  • Grace Paley by Dan Mauk – Brief death notice and tribute to Grace by someone saved from a police beating by her vigilence.
  • Blessed Franz! by Jane Sammon – A celebration of the beatification of Franz Jagerstatter, German draft resister who rejected idolatory of the State. Suggests Jagerstatter as a patron for today’s objectors.
  • Book Review: Into the Silent Land: A Guide to the Christian Practice of Contemplation. By Martin Laird, OSA. Oxford University Press New York 2006. Reviewed by Robert Trabold. – Favorable review of a guide to contemplative prayer.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

June/July 2007

September 1, 2007

Dear Readers,

My most recent Digest is both late and briefer than usual, for which I apologize. If you’ve read the June/July 2007 Worker already and have more to say about any of the articles below, please feel free to add details in a comment. I have not yet received a newer issue and will try to be faster about digesting that one when it becomes available to me. – Daniel

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The June/July 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • 2,193,798 And Counting by Jim Reagan -Article on the US prison system, which incarcerates more residents than any other country either in whole numbers or per capita. Calls for reform of the prison system.
  • An Iranian Song of Peace by Terry Rogers – Account of a trip to Iran sponsored by the Fellowship of Reconciliation. Contrasts the warmth that Iranians had for individual Americans versus attitudes towards American government. Also has information about Hafiz, a 14th century Persian Sufi poet whose work became known to the author as “expressing both divine and human love, radiant with forgiveness and generosity.
  • Salvatore Argiro, 1942-2007 by Bernard Connaughton – Obituary of a long-time Catholic Worker House resident.
  • Maryhouse by Amanda W. Daloisio – Reflection on the author’s pregnancy and its links to Advent and Pentecost.
  • Justice Perverted by Matt Vogel – Decries the convictions of Guantanamo whistleblowers such as Lt. Comdr. Matthew Diaz. Also criticizes the US military’s conduct towards Gitmo hunger strikers.
  • Duties of Conscience by Tom Cornell – Article expresses of approval of recent Vatican comments supporting the right and duty of conscientious objection. Daniel’s note – there is an online Catholic News Service story on this visit.
  • Strengthened by Martyrs by Ecclesial Base Communities of Brazil – Statement of Brazillian faithful that they will continue to adhere to the social justice preached by Jesus. Daniel’s note: Some background on Base Communities in Brazil can be found in the book, The birth and impact of the base ecclesial community and liberative theological discourse in Brazil by Andrew Dawson
  • ROTC at Notre Dame by Brian Terrell – Report of how a March 26, 2007 peaceful, prayerful protest against the ROTC presence at Notre Dame led to multiple-arrests. Notes irony of people being arrested while praying at a Catholic educational institution. People arrested included Frank Cordaro, Daniel Baker, Brenna Cussen, Roberta Thurstin-Timmerman, Don Timmerman, Ed Bloomer, Steve Jacobs, Michael Walli, Brian Terrell and Fr. Jim Murphy. Daniel’s Note: Brian’s article can be read online at http://www.indymedia.ie/article/81748.
  • New Sanctuary Movement by Matt Vogel – Favorably commentary on the May 9, 2007 founding meeting of The New Sanctuary Movement.
  • Book Review: Torture: Religious Ethics and National Security. By John Perry, SJ. Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY 2005 and The Question. By Henri Alleg. University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, NE 2006. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of books tracing the history of motivation for torture. Fr. Perry’s book emphasizes that any of us could become torturers under certain circumstances.
  • Book Review: Merton & Friends: A Joint Biography of Thomas Merton, Robert Lax and Edward Rice. By James Harford. Continuum, NY, 2006. Reviewed by Jim Forest. – Favorable review of a new Merton biography. Article also contains some history of Jubilee magazine.

This issue of the Catholic Worker featured a number of books and other items available at a number of the world’s libraries. I’ve created a list of these items at http://www.worldcat.org/profiles/CatholicWorkerDigest/lists/16987.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

June/July 2007 – Book List

August 19, 2007

The following nine books were mentioned in the June/July issue of Catholic Worker. Full digest to follow soon. See hyperlinked list at http://www.worldcat.org/profiles/CatholicWorkerDigest/lists/16987


Circus days & nights
by Robert Lax; Paul J Spaeth
Type: Book
Publisher: Woodstock, N.Y. : Overlook Press, 2000.

The circus of the sun
by Robert Lax; Emil Antonucci
Type: Book : Poetry
Publisher: New York : Journeyman Books, 1959.

Dying is not death
by Lee Hoinacki
Type: Book
Publisher: Eugene, OR : Resource Publications, ©2006.

The gift : poems by the great Sufi master
by Ḥāfiẓ; Daniel James Ladinsky
Type: Book
Publisher: New York : Arkana, 1999.

Introduction to Christianity.
by Benedict, Pope
Type: Book
Publisher: [New York] Herder and Herder [1970, ©1969]

The man in the sycamore tree; the good times and hard life of Thomas Merton.
by Edward Rice
Type: Book
Publisher: Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, 1970.

Merton and friends : a joint biography of Thomas Merton, Robert Lax, and Edward Rice
by James J Harford
Type: Book Internet Resource Internet Resource
Publisher: New York : Continuum, 2006.

The question
by Henri Alleg
Type: Book Internet Resource Internet Resource
Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, ©2006.

Torture : religious ethics and national security
by John Perry
Type: Book Internet Resource Internet Resource
Publisher: Maryknoll, NY : Orbis Books, ©2005.

Apr/May 2007

April 29, 2007

The March/April 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Just Phone Rates in Jail by Matt Vogel – Article explores the extremely high phone rates most families have to pay to speak to incarcerated loved ones and the negative effect this has on rehabilitation. Commends New York for giving up its kickback from the phone company it gave a prison monopoly to.
  • Anger Grows in City Streets by Chris Zimmerman – Describes angry neighborhood reaction to police shooting of Timur Pearson. Describes New Black Panther Party incitement to “put some fear into the system.” [Daniel’s Note – The CW does NOT endorse the BPP’s methods or most of its platform.]
  • Iraqis Face New Sorrow by Cathy Breen – Letters from Jordan about Iraqi Refuges and the Iraqi government’s decision to issue new passports and force refugees to return to Baghdad to get them. Letters describe deteriorating conditions for refugees in Jordan and faults US and Britain for unwillingness to take refugees their war created.
  • Spring Appeal by Editors – The Catholic Worker needs your help! Please send your NON-tax-deductible contribution to the address listed under “subscriptions.” Any amount will help them.
  • Peter Maurin Farm by Else M. Dowdy – A reflection on the last years of Theodore Rooselvet Ridlon, long time CW resident.
  • Five Years Too Long! by Matthew W. Daloisio – Describes continuing protests against the Guantanamo Bay prison run by the United States. Describes efforts to bring the names of detainees into federal courts. Mentions group Witness Against Torture. To bring a speaker to your community or for more information on the Campaign to Shut Down Guantanamo, please contact Matthew W. Daloisio, 55 E. 3rd Street, NY, NY, 10003, (201) 264-4424.
  • Theodore Rooselvet Ridlon, Our “Slim” by Tom Cornell – A tribute to the life of long time Catholic Worker and walker. His origins were shrouded in mystery, but he was kind to all.
  • Death Penalty Review Raise Questions by Alice and Staughton Lynd and Bill Griffin – Reaction and dialog to book review of Death of Innocents in the December 2006 Catholic Worker.
  • Abbe Pierre, R.I.P. by Bill Griffin – Obituary of French Resistance member and later homeless activist Fr. Henri Groues. Abbe Pierre was the founder of the Emmaus Community.
  • Sr. Ruth Heaney, OSB by Rosalie Reigle – Obituary of a Catholic Worker pioneer and prisoner advocate who kept active through her 80s. She received several awards in her lifetime, including the Elaine Aber Humanitarian Award from the Missouri Association for Social Welfare and the papal award Pro Ecclesia et Pontiface. She was married with six children before becoming a nun.
  • More on Ruth Heaney by Cyril Echele – Recollection of Sr. Ruth Heaney by a friend of many years.
  • Memories of Bishop Proano by Joseph E. Mulligan, SJ – Reflections on the prophetic life of Ecuadorian bishop Leonidas Proano, the “bishop of the Indians” with special attention to his work in the 1970s and persecution by Ecuadorian authorities.
  • Book Review – The Call to Discernment in Troubled Times: New Perspectives on the Transformative Wisdom of Ignatius of Loyola by Dean Brackley, SJ , Crossroads Publishing, New York, 2004 Reviewed by Gail M. Presbey. – Mostly favorable review of a new look at St. Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises. Notes author provides three requirements to keep in touch with reality – 1) Let the reality of suffering reach us; 2) undergo personal transformation; and 3) seek wisdom in community.
  • Book Review – To Wisdom Through Failure: A Journey of Compassion, Resistance and Hope. by Larry Rosebaugh, OMI. EPICA, Washington, DC, 2006 Reviewed by Karl Meyer – Favorable review of missionary and peace activist Fr. Larry Rosebaugh. Stories of work in Guatemala, Mexico, El Salvador and while imprisoned.

 

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

 

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

 

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

 

To Subscribe:

 

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

 

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

 

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

January / February 2007

March 5, 2007

?The January/February 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Iraqi Refugees in Amman by Cathy Breen – An account of a six month stay among Iraqi refugees in Jordan. Notes that Iraqis are denied residency in Jordan and subject to deportation. The author surveyed 30 embassies in Jordan and found most countries have closed their door to Iraqis.
  • Is it True? by Usama Abu Kabir – A poem by a Gitmo inmate that I reprinted elsewhere.
  • St. Joseph House by Mark Kalivoda – Reflection on the value of voluntary poverty and the need to experience failure.
  • Collateral Damage by Bill Griffin – Brief comment on article abstracted by PubMed below.
    • 1: Lancet. 2006 Oct 21;368(9545):1421-8.

      Comment in:
      Lancet. 2007 Jan 13;369(9556):101-2; author reply 103-4.
      Lancet. 2007 Jan 13;369(9556):101; author reply 103-4.
      Lancet. 2007 Jan 13;369(9556):101; author reply 103-4.
      Lancet. 2007 Jan 13;369(9556):102-3; author reply 103-4.
      Lancet. 2007 Jan 13;369(9556):102; author reply 103-4.
      Lancet. 2007 Jan 13;369(9556):104.
      Lancet. 2007 Jan 13;369(9556):105.

      Mortality after the 2003 invasion of Iraq: a cross-sectional cluster sample
      survey.

      Burnham G, Lafta R, Doocy S, Roberts L.

      Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. gburnham@jhsph.edu

      BACKGROUND: An excess mortality of nearly 100 000 deaths was reported in Iraq for the period March, 2003-September, 2004, attributed to the invasion of Iraq. Our aim was to update this estimate.

      METHODS: Between May and July, 2006, we did a national cross-sectional cluster sample survey of mortality in Iraq. 50 clusters were randomly selected from 16 Governorates, with every cluster consisting of 40 households. Information on deaths from these households was gathered.

      FINDINGS: Three misattributed clusters were excluded from the final analysis; data from 1849 households that contained 12 801 individuals in 47 clusters was gathered. 1474 births and 629 deaths were reported during the observation period. Pre-invasion mortality rates were 5.5 per 1000 people per year (95% CI 4.3-7.1), compared with 13.3 per 1000 people per year (10.9-16.1) in the 40 months post-invasion. We estimate that as of July, 2006, there have been 654 965 (392 979-942 636) excess Iraqi deaths as a consequence of the war, which corresponds to 2.5% of the population in the study area. Of post-invasion deaths, 601 027 (426 369-793 663) were due to violence, the most common cause being gunfire.

      INTERPRETATION: The number of people dying in Iraq has continued to escalate. The proportion of deaths ascribed to coalition forces has diminished in 2006, although the actual numbers have increased every year. Gunfire remains the most common cause of death, although deaths from car bombing have increased.

  • Impact of Solanus Casey by Ben DeImonico – Reflection on the life of Fr. Solanus Casey, who worked as a priest at NY’s Queen of Angels from 1921-1924. Fr. Casey is currently being considered for sainthood.
  • Leviticus: Stumbling Block for Christians? by Joanne Kennedy and Terry Rogers – Two separate positive reflections on Leviticus. Both highlight social justice instructions of Leviticus, including the commandment not to reap the edges of your field so that the poor could feed themselves from your property.
  • Books on Nonviolence by Quilty – Recommends these four books written by Jim Douglass and available from Wipf and Stock Publishers, 199 West 8th Ave, Suite 3, Eugene OR 97401:
  • Fred Garel, Rip by Mimi Lamb – Short reflection on one-time St. Joseph House cook, contributer to CW and actor with the CW players as Thorton Wilder’s Stage Manager and Tennessee Williams’s Big Daddy, who died on October 23, 2006. Mr. Garel had been estranged from the Catholic Church as a result of his son being molested by a priest, but he never lost faith in God or prayer. Mr. Garel was also the author of a book called Lighting the Lamps. According to xlibris, “Lighting the Lamps is about the many worlds of New York City, past and present–living the robust tenement and street life of the Depression; encountering “the Desert Experience” in NYC faith communities; and meeting extraordinary people while working at a great variety of jobs–starting in the days when a skilled buildings-engineer supervisor might be illiterate and “manual labor” included amazing feats of skill.”
  • Art Center for Peace by Lizz Kaune – A description of work being done in Suchitoto, El Salvador to create an “Art Center for Peace” which would offer a variety of arts classes along with workshops on conflict resolution, spirituality, gender equality and respect for the environment. Describes some obstacles for the project. For more information please contact Sisters of Charity/Project CARP, 41 Emory St, Jersey City, NJ 07304.
  • Alyssa Presente! by Bill Griffin – Brief account of a Schools of the Americas /Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation protest in Ft. Benning, GA. Article excerpts remarks by former Army Colonel Ann Wright, who sees a connection between torture techniques used in Iraq and the WHISC curriculum. Article also mentions the September 2003 suicide of US Army interrogator Alyssa Peterson who objected to US interrogation tactics being used that the Tal-afar airbase in northern Iraq.
  • Natale Pace, 1935-2006 by Siobhan O’Neil – Obituary of kind but highly eccentric Catholic Worker Nat Pace. He always had time for visitors and loved chocolate, even after diabetes made that love problematic. A good singer who sometimes tried the patience of his bishop.
  • Book Review – Overthrow: America’s Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq by Stephen Kinzer, Times Books, Maryknoll, NY, 2006 Reviewed by Tom Cornell – Favorable review of a book containing 14 case studies where the United States overthrew governments of other countries either by invasion or subversion. Some of the countries featured include Hawaii, Phillipines, Panama, Iran. Review highlights point that empire is a bipartisan problem.
  • Book Review – Jesus Today: A Spirituality of Radical Freedom by Albert Nolan, Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY, 2006 Reviewed by Bill Griffin – Favorable review of a book extolling the incarnational spirituality of Jesus Christ, a spirituality for the here and now.
  • Book Review – Danger on the Doorstep: Anti-Catholicism and American Print Culture in the Progressive Era. by Justin Nordstrom, Univ of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, IN, 2006 Reviewed by Jane Sammon – Favorable review of a book outlining the anti-Catholic press of the late 1800s/early 1900s and the Catholic response, including the rise of the Knights of Columbus. Notes with regret that American Catholic enthusiasm for WWI led to greater acceptance of Catholics as “real Americans.”

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

December 2006

January 21, 2007

The December 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Light that Gives Us Hope by Christopher M. Zimmerman – Reflections on 9/11/2001 vs. Christmas. The first has become a day of division and government encouraged fear, the second means “light coming into darkness and hope chasing away gloom.” Recommends celebrating a festival on September 16th known as One Hundred Days to Christmas.
  • People’s Movement in Oaxaca by Deirdre Cornell – An account of the AEPO, the State Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca. Description of the diverse nature of this democracy movement in one of Mexico’s poorest states. Also has some background on an indigenous decision making system know as “usos y costumbres (literally, uses and customs) based on traditional models and participation.
  • Shut Down Guantanamo! by Frida Berrigan & Matthew W. Daloisio – An account of the work done by legal, medical and social groups in 2006 to try and close down the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Article offers this breakdown of 517 prisoners at Guantanamo based on Social Science Research Network analysis of recently released DoD data:
    • al-Qaeda fighters only made up 8% of prisoners.
    • Only 5% of prisoners were captured on the battlefield.
    • 86% of the prisoners were captured by either Pakistan or the Northern Alliance and turned over to US custody for payment of large bounties.
    • The article also notes that as of July 2006, 75% of the prisoners were no longer being interrogated.
  • The Common Good and the Land by T. Christopher Cornell – A reflection on the possibilities of intensive natural agriculture. Notes that for the past two years, Peter Maurin Farm has given 6,000 pounds of fresh, usable produce to friends, visitors, local soup kitchens and CW houses in the city. For more on intensive agriculture, the author recommends the Sheep Ranch Catholic Worker’s new publication, 21st Century Agitator. Contact Chris Montesano, Box 53, Sheep Ranch, CA 95250. This article mentions the following books:
  • Blanket Appeal by Editors – An appeal for blankets to be brought to the New York Catholic Worker House. Contact information in “Subscription” section below. I’d recommend you contact them before sending any blankets.
  • House List Update by Editors – A list of CW houses that have either changed address, just formed or have closed. Full contact information in the paper. If you’d like addresses and can’t find a copy of the Dec 2006 CW, please e-mail me and I’ll get the address for you if I haven’t lost my paper.
    • Changed Address
      • Sacramento CW
      • Oakland CW
    • New Houses
      • St. Joseph’s – Troy, OH
      • St. Patrick’s Kitchen – Troy, OH
      • St. Francis House – New London, CT
      • Stevensville CW Farm – Stevensville, MT
      • Omaha Catholic Worker – Omaha, NE
      • Promised Land CW Farm – Christchurch, New Zealand
    • Closed Houses
      • John Filligar CW Farm – Pence Springs, WV
      • Mary Harris CW – Washington DC
      • Llewellyn Scott House – Washington DC
  • Nuclear North Dakota by Carmen Trotta – Describes outcome of Plowshares action against a nuclear silo in North Dakota in 2006. Notes US non-compliance with Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and suggests that a nuclear strike on the United States within a decade is possible.
  • Labor Letter by George Albertz – An appeal to locate current or former ACLU lawyer Ed McGuire who helped out Hubert Albertz in his “fight to clean up SEIU Local 32E.” Appeal is made by son George Albertz. No contact information provided other than “Bruderhof community in Harlem” If you know where to find Mr. McGuire, please try to contact Mr. Albertz through the New York Catholic Worker House.
  • Catonsville Film by Bill Griffin – Favorable review of the movie Investigation of a Flame: A Documentary Portrait of the Catonsville Nine. This film can be purchased from First Run/Icarus Films, 32 Court Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201, 718-488-8900 and 800-876-1710. “All proceeds are being donated to the Viva House Catholic Worker in Baltimore.”
  • Build the City of God by Jim Reagan – A reflection on Advent that also talks about the high cost of New York housing.
  • Sr. Mary Luke Tobin, R. I. P. by Bill Ofenloch – Obituary of a nun who was one of 15 women invited to participate in Vatican II. “She spoke and wrote tirelessly on peace and social justice issues, for women’s rights and against war and preparations for war. She picketed with the United Farmworkers, was arrested and jailed for protesting the Vietnam War, played a major role in the ecumenical movement, and was an adviser to the Women’s Ordination Movement. She was also a ballet dancer!”
  • Book Review – Peacework: Prayer, Resistance, Community by Henri Nouwen, Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY, 2005 Reviewed by Grace Yukich – Favorable review of a book that asserts that peacemaking is impossible without prayer, resistance and community. Each aspect feeds the others, but prayer is considered the most important. Saying “yes” to live is as important as saying “NO!” to violence and death.
  • Book Review – The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions by Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ Vintage Books, New York, 2005 Reviewed by Bill Griffin – Favorable review of a book written by long-time pro-life activist Sister Helen Prejean. Article asserts that one hundred two three death row inmates have been exonerated through the use of DNA evidence since the death penalty was reintroduced in 1977. A podcast of an author interview is available.

     

    ———————

    As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

     

    1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

     

    2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

    Phil Runkel
    Archivist
    Department of Special Collections and University Archives
    Raynor Memorial Libraries
    Marquette University
    1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
    Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
    414-288-5903
    http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

    3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

     

    To Subscribe:

     

    Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

     

    Send your subscription requests to:

    Catholic Worker
    36 East 1st St.
    New York, NY 10003
    Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

     

    Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

    August / September 2004

    November 19, 2006

    Like nearly 58,000 other people in this country, I subscribe to Catholic Worker, a newspaper founded by Dorothy Day back in the 1920s. Catholic Worker carries stories on peace and justice issues from a Catholic and personalist perspective. Unlike so much else in this world, Catholic Worker is not available electronically, and so might escape the notice of many in the Internet community.

    I’d like to change that, within the bounds of copyright and fair use, so today I launch “Catholic Worker Digest”, a listing of articles appearing in each issue of Catholic Worker. Catholic Worker is issued seven times a year. My first three issues will appear over the next three weeks, because I started with the Aug-Sept 2004 issue, which I had laying around the house. Suggestions for obtaining full text of Catholic Worker articles and subscription information appear at the end of the digest.

    Articles contained in the Aug/Sept 2004 Catholic Worker:

    • Solidarity and Suffering – Interview with Pat Rice on human rights work.
    • Methods of Tyranny – Review of American detention and interrogation methods in the War on Terror.
    • I am an Ordinary Man – Brief profile of Israeli nuclear whistleblower Mordechai Vanunu.
    • Another path of resistance – Profile of US deserter Jeremy Hinzman. Contains tidbits of Basic Training methods as perceived by Mr. Hinzman.
    • Anarchist Christians – Debate about whether there is such a thing as a Christian anarchist.
    • David Dellinger 1915-2004 – Obituary of peace and justice activist David Dellinger.
    • Book Review of Capital Homesteading for Every Citizen by Norman G. Kurland.
    • Book Review of Fear Anger & Failure: A Chronicle of the Bush Administration’s War against Terror from the attacks of 9/11/2001 to defeat in Baghdad by William Pfaff.
    • Mattie Robinson, 1943-2004 – Obituary of long time CW house resident.
    • Ed Marciniak 1918-2004 – Obituary of a Chicago Catholic Worker House founder.

    If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have two suggestions:

    1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

    2) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

    To Subscribe:

    Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

    Send your subscription requests to:

    Catholic Worker
    36 East 1st St.
    New York, NY 10003
    Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

    Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.