March/April 2008 – Abbreviated

June 22, 2008

On the principle that something is better than nothing at all, this month’s digest will be a simple listing of titles and authors of stories appearing in the March/April 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker. Any hyperlinks below are to related information on the web and not to the article in the paper.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Advertisements

For NYC: May/Jun Friday Meetings

May 24, 2008

Hi All,

I’m way behind on the digest, but wanted to get a note out about Friday CW meetings in New York City for May 30 and June. These are the last meetings before September, so if you’ve been wanting to go, now’s the time. If I lived in New York, I would.

All meetings begin at 7:45pm:

May 30 – Robert Ellsberg: The Duty of Delight — The Diaries of Dorothy Day.*

June 6 – James Fisher: Justice on the Docks — the Waterfront Priests.*

June 13 – Brian Picket et al: Vote Debs in ’08 (play) Anarchists Welcome!

June 20 – Matt Daloisio et al: Critical Issues in War & Peace–Where Do We Go from Here?

Why the meetings? I’ll let the Worker itself explain:

In keeping with Peter Maurin’s recognition of the need for ongoing clarification of thought, we invite you to join us for our weekly Friday night meetings. The meetings are held either at Maryhouse–55 East Third St, 212-777-9617, or St. Joseph House, 36 East First St, 212-254-1640. As far ahead as we can see, those we will hold at First Street will be marked with an *. Feel welcome to call and confirm the schedule. Both houses are between First and Second Avenues (2nd Ave. stop on the F or V train).

So, if you’re within driving distance of New York, please attend if you can. If you do, please leave a comment here or send an e-mail to dnlcornwall AT alaska DOT net.

Apr/May Meetings

April 19, 2008

This entry is being written on April 19, 2008 and I just received my Mar/Apr 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker a few days ago. Look for a full digest in the next week or so. Because I know I have several readers in the New York City area, I wanted to point out the CW Friday Night Meetings while that information is still useful.

All meetings begin at 7:45pm:

April 25 – Michael S. Foley: Draft Resistance in Boston during the Vietnam War.

May 2 – Selected Readings from the Catholic Worker on War and Peace.

May 9 – Readings from the Works of Daniel Berrigan. Happy Birthday Dan!

May 16 – A.B. Bhardwaj: Gandhi’s Relevance in Politics Today.

Why the meetings? I’ll let the Worker itself explain:

In keeping with Peter Maurin’s recognition of the need for ongoing clarification of thought, we invite you to join us for our weekly Friday night meetings. The meetings are held either at Maryhouse–55 East Third St, 212-777-9617, or St. Joseph House, 36 East First St, 212-254-1640. As far ahead as we can see, those we will hold at First Street will be marked with an *. Feel welcome to call and confirm the schedule. Both houses are between First and Second Avenues (2nd Ave. stop on the F or V train).

So, if you’re within driving distance of New York, please attend if you can. If you do, please leave a comment here or send an e-mail to dnlcornwall AT alaska DOT net.

January/February 2008

April 6, 2008

The January-February 2008 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Desert Death for Immigrants by Sarah Brook – Describes the often racist opposition to today’s immigrants. Focuses on Arizona and Phoenix.
  • Gordon Zahn 1918-2007 by Michael W. Hovey – Obituary of lifelong pacificist who died on December 9, 2007 from complications of Alzheimer’s disease in a nursing home outside Milwaukee WI. Zahn was an author as well as an activists and his works can be located at http://worldcat.org/search?q=gordon+charles+zahn&qt=facetNavigation&sd=desc.
  • Justice is Served! by Bill Griffin – Announcement of a service sector union campaign called Justice Will be Served! For more information, please contact Justice Will be Served! Campaign c/o National Mobilization Against Sweatshops PO Box 130293, NY NY 10013, (212) 334-2333/
  • Good News vs. Death Penalty by Art Laffin and Matt Vogel – Two brief items under the same title. Art Laffin describes his participation in the Cities of Life Campaign while in Rome. Mr. Laffin is a member of a murder victim’s family who opposes the death penalty. Matt Vogel describes how New Jersey has officially abandoned the death penalty.
  • Memories of Camp Warner by Gordon Zahn – An excerpt from the CW, Oct-Nov 1977. Camp Warner was a detention camp in New Hamshire for Catholic conscientious objectors during WWII. The article commemorated the opening of the camp in 1942.
  • Blessed Franz, Resister Saint by Bruce Kent – Reflections on the life of Franz Jagerstatter, which has affected people as far away as Turkey. Proposes his life as an example of how to say now to today’s culture of death and consumerism.
  • Sammantha, R.I.P. by Matt Daloisio – Relates the story of a veteran who committed suicide. Article notes that at least 6,256 US veterans committed suicide in 2005.
  • First Casualty of War by Bill Griffin – Summary of media accounts and leaked memos that suggest that torture is still being practiced by the CIA and other agencies under the cover of the “war on terror”.
  • One Way to Support Peace by Stanley Bohn – Supports tax resistance as a way to stop the occupation of Iraq. Also describes HR 1921, the Freedom of Religion Peace Tax Fund, which would make redirection of taxes by conscientious objectors to war legal.
  • The Bishop & the Dam by Matt Vogel – Continuing coverage of the ongoing efforts of Bishop Luiz Flavio Cappio and residents of the Brazillian state of Bahia to stop the damming and division of the Sao Francisco River. Bishop Cappio stopped his most recent hunger strike after 24 days on December 20, 2007.
  • Book Review: The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil. By Philip Zimbardo. Random House, New York, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable Review of an account of the notorious Stanford Prison Experiment of 1971 and its spooky similarity to what happened at Abu Gharib. Shows how the gov’t could have knowingly created an environment likely to result in torture w/o having to give specific orders for mistreatment.
  • Book Review: Fear Up Harsh: An Army Interrogator’s Dark Journey Through Iraq. By Tony Lagouranis with Allan Mikaelian. New American Library, New York, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of the story of an admitted US torturer in Iraq. Book relates toll torture takes on perpetrator as well as victim. Relates Spc Lagouranis eventual conversion and whistleblowing.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

December 2007

January 30, 2008

The December 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Deportations and Families by Members of the New Sanctuary Movement – Two concrete examples of how current immigration policies are anti-family.
  • Between Iraq and Jordan by Cathy Breen – Three letters detailing troubles of Iraqi refugees in Jordan and Syria. Highlights Syria’s relative generosity and describes a visit to the monastery of St. Moses the Abyssinian.
  • Maryhouse by Amanda W. Daloisio – Reflections on gratitude. Mentions Teresa of Avila, Wendell Berry, Kathy Kelly, and St. Therese of Lisieux.
  • Christ’s Peace is Our Work by Jim Reagan – Reflections on the Christian obligation for peacemaking. Notes that the proportion of civilians among those killed or wounded in war has risen from 5% in World War I to 75% in today’s conflicts. Expresses opinion that war doesn’t simply halt the Corporal Works of Mercy, but actually reverses them.
  • Education on the Inside by Sammy Moore – Excerpt from a speech presented to the New Jersey State NAACP Convention on September 22, 2007 by the president of the NJ NAACP prison chapter president. Mr. Moore is currently serving 40 years to life. He describes his efforts to become educated, the difficulties prisoners have in becoming educated and the moral practical benefits of educating prisoners. Briefly describes the work of the NAACP Prison Project.
  • Mohammed Eausack, 1926-2007 by Matt Vogel – Obituary of a sick Muslim elder who came to the NY Catholic Worker house via his doctor at a homeless shelter. Described as gentle and witty, Mr. Eausack was a “great symbol of stubborn strength for many in the house. Though he slowed, he never really stopped fighting, struggling to get through the day.”
  • Pizza Resistance by Matt Vogel – Relates the store of resistance against the death penalty and hunger inspired by Death Row inmate Philip Workman‘s request that a homeless person be given a vegetarian pizza in lieu of Workman’s last meal.
  • An Italian Christmas Tale by Jack Cook – A retelling of the legend of La Befana, a woman who searches for her dead son and recognizes him in the baby Jesus.
  • Book Review: A Power Governments Cannot Suppress. By Howard Zinn. City Lights Books, San Francisco, CA 2007. Reviewed by Gene Roman. – Favorable Review of a compilation of essays Zinn wrote for The Progressive. The article says that Zinn “digs through the archives of American history to shine a bright light on union struggles for a decent wage, religious resistance to war and the policies of US Presidents from George Washington to George W. Bush.”
  • Book Review: People Power: Fifty Peacemakers and Their Communities. By Michael True. Rawat Publications, Jaipur, India, 2007. Reviewed by Jane Sammon. – Favorable review of a book profiling Thomas Merton, Howard Zinn, Delores Huerta, Adin Ballou, and Abigail Kelly, among others.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Has anyone out there got Dec 2007?

December 29, 2007

UPDATE 1/16/2008 – December 2007 arrived today.
——————-
Hi All,

In case you’ve been wondering why a new digest hasn’t come out this month, it’s because I’ve yet to receive my December 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker. I haven’t seen it in my church either, which for whatever reason gets the Worker about a week before I get mine at home.

I know the Worker has been having problems getting stuff mailed to locations outside the lower 48. So if you read this blog, and you’ve received a copy would you either leave me a comment or send me an e-mail letting me know what city you live in and when you got your copy?

Even better, if you’d take one of the previous digest entries as a model, I’d really appreciate it if you would put together a “guest digest” and e-mail it to me at dnlcornwall “AT” alaska.net. I’ll give you credit when the entry is posted.

I will probably pull this entry if my copy of CW comes in before someone sends me a guest digest.

Thanks and I hope you have a blessed 2008 with an outpouring of justice. – Daniel

October/November 2007

November 3, 2007

The October/November 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Divinity Here and Now by Dorothy Day – Reprint of 1949 article reflecting on how motherhood brings a person out of themselves and provides faith life will continue. Also reflects on every Christian’s call to sainthood.
  • Recommendation & Request by Jim Forest and Robert Ellsberg – Jim Forest recommends the DVD version of the Dorothy Day biographical play Fool for Christ. Robert Ellsberg is beginning to collect and edit the letters of Dorothy Day. If you have some letters or know who does, please contact Robert Ellsberg at at Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY 10545.
  • In Human Terms by Bill Griffin – Commends the work of Ha’aretz columnist Amira Hass for humanizing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • CIW & Prison Phone Updates by Matt Vogel – These two short articles celebrate victories for justice. The Coalition of Immokale Workers, a Florida-based agricultural union convinced McDonald’s to pay growers an extra penny a pound for tomatoes. This agreement also raises workers wages and improves working conditions. In a separate update, the State of New York has agree to stop profiting from inmate phone cards. Work to get other states to follow suit is being undertaken by the Center for Constitutional Rights.
  • Torture on Trial in Arizona by Bill Quigley – Account of the ongoing trial of Fransican Fr. Louis Vitale and Jesuit Fr. Stephen Kelly for attempting to deliver a protest letter to the Fr. Huachuca office of Major General Barbara Fast. Article touches on incidents of US torture and the suicide of Abu Gharib interrogator Army Specialist Alyssa R. Peterson. According to the article, the outcome of the trial will not affect November 2007 protests planned for Ft. Huachuca. For information about the trial or the November protest, contact Jack or Felice Cohen-Joppa at 520-323-8697. Daniel’s Note: according to the group Pace e Bene, the two priests have been given a five month prison sentence.
  • Remember, Respond, Resist by Tanya Theriault – Accounts of remembrance and resistance relating to the American atomic bombings of WWII and our current occupation of Iraq.
  • Wrenched from My Heart by John Pitts Corry – A reflection on our obligations to the poor and how we in the West are all rich because we have shones.
  • Cardinal Lustiger, 1926-2007 by Bill Griffin – Obituary for Jewish convert and conservative French Catholic Bishop. Description of the complexity of his life and work and of his role in reconciling Catholics and Jews.
  • Beth Rogers, 1919-2007 by Felton Davis – Obituary of a long-time Catholic Worker and senior circulation manager. Has a number of reflections from the 1940s/1950s.
  • Grace Paley by Dan Mauk – Brief death notice and tribute to Grace by someone saved from a police beating by her vigilence.
  • Blessed Franz! by Jane Sammon – A celebration of the beatification of Franz Jagerstatter, German draft resister who rejected idolatory of the State. Suggests Jagerstatter as a patron for today’s objectors.
  • Book Review: Into the Silent Land: A Guide to the Christian Practice of Contemplation. By Martin Laird, OSA. Oxford University Press New York 2006. Reviewed by Robert Trabold. – Favorable review of a guide to contemplative prayer.

————————–

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Nov/Dec 2007 NYC Friday Meetings

November 3, 2007

This entry is being written on November 3, 2007 and I just received my Aug/Sept 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker a few days ago. Look for a full digest in the next week or so. Because I know I have several readers in the New York City area, I wanted to point out the CW Friday Night Meetings while that information is still useful.

All meetings begin at 7:45pm:

Nov 9 – Anna Brown: Etty Hillesum–The Language of the Incandescent Heart
Nov 16 – Marie Ponsot and Lawrence Joseph: Poetry against nonviolence
Nov 23 – No Meeting. Happy Thanksgiving!
Nov 30 – Alice Hendrickson: A Year in Southeast Turkey Among the Kurds*
Dec 7 – Anthony Giacchino’s film – The Camden 28
Dec 14 – A Conversation with the NYC New Sanctuary Movement.*
Dec 21 – Annual Christmas Party — Please Join Us!
Dec 28 – No Meeting–Happy New Year!

Why the meetings? I’ll let the Worker itself explain:

In keeping with Peter Maurin’s recognition of the need for ongoing
clarification of thought, we invite you to join us for our weekly Friday night
meetings. The meetings are held either at Maryhouse–55 East Third St,
212-777-9617, or St. Joseph House, 36 East First St, 212-254-1640. As far ahead
as we can see, those we will hold at First Street will be marked with an *. Feel
welcome to call and confirm the schedule. Both houses are between First and
Second Avenues (2nd Ave. stop on the F or V train).

So, if you’re within driving distance of New York, please attend if you can. If you do, would you leave a comment here or send an e-mail to dnlcornwall AT alaska.net.

August/September 2007

September 23, 2007

The August 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Education for Goodness Sake by Jim Reagan – Reflection on the purpose of education. Argues that employability alone should not be the purpose of education.
  • Our Nuclear Denial Persists by Eileen Egan – Reprint of an August 1976 article about Americans’ refusal to face the consequences of our nuclear weapons.
  • Sentenced to Struggle by Matt Vogel – Disturbing case study of how a mentally ill person gets shuffled from being homeless to the courts to prison, back on the streets and back again. Notes that neither courts nor prisons are equipped to deal with serious mental illness. Commends the Housing First model as a humane and money saving alternative to prison.
  • Fr. David Kirk, 1935-2007 by Orthodox Church in America – Reprint of an obituary of a Christian Orthodox priest known for his work with the poor in Harlem. Founder of Emmaus House. Other accounts of Fr. Kirk’s life can be found in the New York Times, on NPR, and on the OCA website.
  • Peter Lumsden, 1935-2007 by John Sullivan – Obituary of “Long time friend of the Catholic Worker.” Known of his hospitality and opposition to the draft.
  • Aparecida: See, Judge, Act by Florence Anderson – Brief account of the “Fifth Encounter” of the Church in Latin America and the Carribean.
  • Book Review: Blackwater: The rise of the world’s most powerful mercenary army. By Jeremy Scahill, Nationa Books, NY 2007 Reviewed by Tom Cornell. – Mostly favorable review of book critical of the use of private security firms in war zones and the lack of accountability that creates. James Schahill spoke about his book to Truthdig and to Democracy Now.
  • Book Review: Journey of a Jihadist. By Fawaz A. Gerges. Harcourt, NY, 2007. Reviewed by Bill Griffin. – Favorable review of a book by author who was born in 1958 in Lebanon and whose experience was marked by Christians and Muslims living in peace. Book argues that the September 11, 2001 attacks were rejected by all but a small minority of Islam and that Jihadist Islam’s greatest support at the current time is the United States, which is providing plausibility to the Jihadist claims that the US is engaging in a long term crusade against the Islamic world.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

Catholic Worker House – Surplus Food

September 19, 2007

This video gives a brief overview of how one Catholic Worker House is feeding the poor. If anyone knows WHERE this house is, please leave a comment.

And please give me feed back on whether you want to see CW related videos in with the digest. Speaking of which, I hope to finish Aug/Sept this weekend.