Archive for November, 2006

October-November 2006

November 20, 2006

The October-November 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Poor Policy in Las Vegas by Julia Occhiogrosso – Article on the Las Vegas City Council has banned two of the Catholic Corporeal Works of Mercy by banning “the providing of food or meals to the indigent for free or a nominal fee in city parks.” Suggests that Mass for the homeless or Jesus’ feeding of the multitudes would have been illegal under the new ordinance. Asserts that while City Council stated the ordinance was intended to help indigents find formal social services, claims that Las Vegas rates among the lowest in the nation in providing mental health and social services. Information in the article came from the Las Vegas Catholic Worker Community.
  • The Only Solution is Love by Dorothy Day  – Reprint of an article from the May 1978 issue of the Catholic Worker. Most important question from the article is: “All men are brothers, yes but how to love your brother or sister when they are sunk in ugliness, foulness, and degradation, so that all of the senses are affronted? How to love when the adversary shows a face to you of implacable hatred, or just cold loathing?” Contains reflections on love in community.
  • NYC Tenants Need Justice! by Matt Vogel  – Unfavorable commentary on the recent action of the NY Rent Guidelines Board raising rents by the largest margins since 2003. Explanation of the two types of rent control in New York city, the appeals process and ways for landlords to remove themselves from the system. Cites a New York University study on the problem of affordable housing in New York City. Article does not name the NYU study, but from context seems likely to be State of New York City’s Housing and Neighborhoods 2005. Article also refers to the 2005 Housing and Vacancy Study prepared for New York City by the US Census Bureau.
  • Fall Appeal by Editors – An appeal for funds to continue the publication of the Catholic Worker.  They need more funds in part “The post office raises the rates for non-automated mailings, like ours,  much more steeply than those of automated ones. Our understanding of personalism includes a commitment to manual labor and resistance to the upping of the ante of automation for as long as possible, since we know that many jobs are lost in that process.” NON-tax deductable donations can be sent to the address that appears in the “to subscribe” section below.
  • A Young Nurse in Brooklyn by Bill Lonneman – A story of Dorothy Days service as a nurse in late 1910s/early 1920s. Author suggests that experience helped to “ground her and confirm her sense that direct care for human beings in need was a critical element in her life and the life of a healthy society.”
  • Pit Stop Ploughshares by Carmen Trotta – Account of the acquittal of five people who took part in a  Ploughshares protest in Ireland. Also discusses jury nullification and ways that nations can wage war without using the word.
  • Report from the West Bank by Jo Roberts – Observations on the Israeli occupation of the West Bank from an American who spends some time in the village of Hares in the region of Salfit. Ms. Roberts was in the West Bank as a member of the International Women’s Peace Service (IWPS).
  • The Image of God by Bill Griffin –  Religious based condemnation of torture focusing on biblical material used by the Rabbis for Human Rights-North America.  An example of their rhetoric not used in the article can be found on their website: “R. Akiva says… You should not say: Because I have been dishonored, let my fellow man be dishonored along with me… R. Tanhuma explained: If you do so, know whom you are dishonoring – ‘He made him in the likeness of God.’ (Gen. 5:1) (Breishit Rabbah 24 and Sifra, Kedoshim 2:4).” The Rabbis can also be contacted by regular mail at PO Box 1539, West Tisbury, MA 02575 or by phone at 508-696-1880.
  • Peace Apostle by Tom Fasy  – Quick hello from a depleted uranium conference in Hiroshima, Japan.
  • John Cort, 1913-2006 by Tom Cornell  – Obituary of one of the earliest Catholic Workers who started at the Main Street House in 1936. He still cantored in his local parish at the age of 92. Wrote several books and was described as “personally conservative but socially and politically radical, well-read but never pedantic, funny, chivalrous, of broad culture but a man of the people.” Unlike most Catholic Workers, John Cort was not a pacifist, but opposed the Vietnam War using Just War theory.
  • Hope in Place of Prison  by Bill Griffin  – Story of the ministry of Abraham House, “a small community dedicated to supporting prisoners and their families as the make the critical transition out of prison.” To learn more about Abraham House or to offer aid, the address is PO Box 305, Mott Haven Station, Bronx, New York 10454 or call them at 718-292-9321.
  • Joe Wells, 1943-2006 by Simeon Swinger  – Obituary of the cancer death of a well loved CW. Obituary is mostly about his good nature and how helped many people straighten out their lives. Contrasted worldly success with the success in human living that was Joe Wells.
  • Venate Martin, 1925-2006  by Tanya Theriault and Matt Vogel – Obituary of hard-working Haitian immigrant and Catholic Worker. She originally came to the United States without working papers but worked every day of her life. She had a devotion to the Little Flower and touched many people.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

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August / September 2006

November 20, 2006


The following articles appeared in the August-September 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker:

  • Report from New Orleans by Bill Quigley – A bleak assessment of life in New Orleans after Katrina. Asserts that the poor and public institutions remain the most impacted. Mentions the relief work of Common Ground Collective and People’s Hurricane Relief. Articles notes reconstruction efforts of Christian, Jewish and Muslim groups.
  • Flight into the Unknown by Kathy Breen – A bleak assessment of civilian life in Iraq. Notable for its quotes from Shias, Sunnis and Kurds. Expresses sense of some Iraqis that all chaos in Iraq is the fault of Iraq’s neighbors and/or the United States. Disbelief that Iraqis hold significant responsibility for society. Article makes mention of Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT). 
  • School’s In – Speak Out! by Amanda W. Daloisio and Tanya Theriault – An appeal to college students to work for the abolition of torture. Offers suggestions for student action including showing the film Road to Guantanamo. Article mentions group Witness against Torture.
  • St. Joseph House by Silke Tudor – Reflections of a new volunteer at St. Joseph’s Catholic Worker House. Talks of the beauty of everyday life and the self-nourishment that comes with giving.
  • Rent Hi-Rise Unwise by Bernard Connaughton – Letter expresses discontent with the lack of local rent control in NYC.
  • French Connection by Mike True – Account of a three day conference of anarcho-pacificists, former communists, teachers and students at the University of Savoy in France. Also mentions protests against France’s First Employment Contract.
  • Billions for Bases by Pat Sullivan, OFM Cap. – Letter from Okinawa Japan using the US basing behavior in Japan and especially Cuba to posit the likelihood of large permanent bases in Iraq. Author is discouraged at this prospect.
  • Little Way in the Big Easy by Melissa Jameson – Personal account of Gulf Coast relief work being done by the Common Ground Collective (see above for link). Article also mentions Seeds of Peace Collective.
  • Film Review: The Battle of Algiers by Bill Griffin – Favorable review of the 1966 movie The Battle of Algiers . Suggests the film holds lessons for United States involvement in Iraq. Also mentions short documentary, The Dictatorship of Truth.
  • CW Book List by Editors – List of books related to the Catholic Worker Movement. I’ll to put up the full list in a future entry, but these books were identified as out of print and so I thought I’d share library catalog records for those now:
  • Moratorium on Death Penalty by Celeste Fitzgerald – Describes success of the New Jerseyans for alternatives to the death penalty (NJADPP) in obtaining a one year moratorium on executions in New Jersey. NJADPP can be contacted at 986 S. Broad St. Trenton, NJ 08611 or by phone at 609-278-6719.
  • Letter for Life by Ed Kinane – Letter expresses the belief that killing is always wrong, whether it is done by individuals or the State. Argues that techniques designed by the military to produce desentization to violence will harm people overseas and here at home.
  • Book Review: Look Homeward, America: In Search of Reactionary Radicals and Front-Porch Anarchists, by Bill Kauffman, ISI Books, Wilmington DE, 2006. Reviewed by Geoffrey Gneuhs – Favorable review of a book of essays about people who have inspired the author. Persons covered in the book include Dorothy Day , Peter Maurin , Eugene McCarthy , artist Grant Wood and Wendell Berry . Reviewer calls the book, “a song to liberty, truth, goodness and beauty, family and community, to hearth and home, to farm and small town.”
  • Book Review: A Question of Torture: CIA Interrogation, from the Cold War to the War on Terror, by Alfred W. McCoy. Metropolitan Books, New York, NY Reviewed by Tom Cornell – Favorable review of a book that traces current US torture policy back to the early Cold War and asserts that degrading treatment is a bipartisan affair. References the 1963 CIA Kubark training manual and the current Army Field ManualView snippets on Google Book Search.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

June / July 2006

November 19, 2006

The June/July 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Stories From Our Parish by Joe and Sabra McKenzie-Hamilton –  Stories from New York’s Church of the Nativity, home to poor and immigrant parishioners since 1842. This church is on the list of parishes and schools slated to be closed by the Archdiocese of New York.
  • Jeannette Noel, 1916-2006 by Bernard Connaughton  – Obituary of a long-time Catholic Worker who survived two husbands and moved into Maryhouse at the age of 62. She taught centering prayer and died at the Cabrini nursing home. Attached to this story is a letter that Jeannette wrote to Dorothy Day in 1977.
  • Church Closings and the Poor by CW Staff  – Reflections on the impacts of a plan to close parishes and schools, primarily in New York City and open new parishes in the northern counties of the Archdiocese of New York .
  • Immokalee Workers Tour by Matt Vogel – Report on the Real Rights Truth Tour, staged by the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW), a group of more than 3,000, mostly Latino, Mayan Indian and Haitian farmworkers from southwest Florida. The tour took place March 26 to April 2, 2006.
  • Puppet Appeal by Bill Griffin – An appeal for funds for the Bread and Puppet Theater in West Glover Vermont. All donations should be sent to Bread & Puppet Theater, Museum Barn Fund, c/o Linda Elbow, 700 Andersonville Road, West Glover, Vermont 057875.
  • Joe Zarrella, 1916-2006 by Caroyn Zablotny-Horton – Obituary of long-time Catholic Worker Joe Zarrella. Among his accomplishments were 67 years of marriage to Alice Lautner. Joe served in soup kitchens well into his 80s.
  • Immigrants Rally in NYC by Jim Reagan – Account of immigration rights rally in New York that drew an estimated 100,000 – 125,000 on April 10, 2006. Rally was sponsored by a coalition of more than two hundred labor, community, and religious organizations. Persons attended included Americans, Mexicans, Poles, El Salvadorans, Irish, Chinese, Pakistan, Koreans, Indians, Haitians and more.
  • Prison Letter by Clare Grady – A letter from an occupant of cell 312 of the Federal Detention Center from Philadelphia Pennsylvania. Talks about the beauty available from her cell and suggested that Jesus’ primary mission was the liberation of people from Empires of all stripes. At the time of this letter, Clare Grady was serving a six month sentence fro her civil disobedience on St. Patrick’s Day, 2003 at a recruiting station in Ithaca, NY. Daniel’s note: Clare is a member of the St. Patrick’s Four.
  • Stephen DeMott, 1948-2006 by Ellen de Mott Grady  – Obituary of Maryknoll Missioner Fr. Stephen T. De Mott, who did most of his ministry in Central and South America. 
  • Colombia: Violence and Hope by John Dear, SJ  – Background on recent events in Columbia and the work of Cecilla Zarate Laun and the Columbia Support Network.
  • William Sloan Coffin, R. I. P.  by Bill Ofenloch  – Short obituary for Freedom Rider and Reverend William Sloan Coffin. Commends his work in the civil rights and peace movements of the 1960s.
  • Book Review – The School of the Americas: Military Training and Political Violence by Lesley Gill  AND Disturbing the Peace: The Story of Father Roy Bourgeois and the Movement to close the School of the Americas by James Hodge and Linda Cooper – Favorable review of both books. Suggested as complementary resources for people studying the critique of the School of the Americas, now known as the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

May 2006

November 19, 2006

The May 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Air Raid Drills & the NYCW by Tom Cornell –  Story of how a few dedicated individuals, who endured jail in a time of indifference, eventually were able to stop the fear-inducing, yet useless NY Air Raid drills of the late 50s and early 1960s.
  • Easy Essay: They and We by Peter Maurin  – A short paragraph reflecting on how people tend to want others to do things, but do not see themselves in need of reform.
  • Easy Essay: Institutions by Peter Maurin  – Short paragraph reflecting on institutions, which Maurin believed to foster the welfare of the masses, and corporations, which he believed to be organized for the wealth of the few.
  • Deliver Us from Fear by Dorothy Day –  A 1967 meditation on how the United States, the most powerful country in the world, can also be one of the most fearful. Calls upon God to deliver from fear and help us to the hard work of loving our enemies.
  • End the Death Penalty Now! by Scott Langley – Provides information surrounding the 1000th execution in the United States since 1977 and notes that 122 death row inmates were discovered to be innocent and released.
  • St. Joseph House by Matt Vogel – Reflections on life lived in community.
  • Maryhouse by Amanda W. Daloisio – Reflections on becoming closer to God through cooking, cleaning, and caring for others.
  • Peter Maurin Farm by T. Christopher Cornell – Reflections on a life of voluntary poverty and hard work.
  • Pierre Conway, 1915-2006 by Geoffrey Gneuhs – 
  • Aims and Means of the Catholic Worker by Editors  –  Yearly reprint of what the Catholic Worker is all about.
  • God Have Mercy by Bill Griffin – Article on the use of forced feeding and restraint chairs to break a hunger strike at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility. Calls for closure of the facility.
  • Sweet Fruit of the Spirit by Jim Reagan – Article on the difference between personal charity and institutional charity. Questions the effectiveness of the latter.
  • Eileen Storey, 1925-2005 by Sr. Anne Montgomery – Obituary of a woman who was memorialized as “Like Elizabeth Seton, Eileen was a citizen of the world. Through her language and literature, her journeys and contemplative prayer, she touched the hearts of people in Asia, Europe, India, Nassau, Iraq, Guatemala, Rye, Greenwich Village…”
  • Book Review – War and the Christian Conscience: Where do You Stand, by Joseph J. Fahey. Reviewed by Tom Cornell –  Favorable review of a work that “attempts to guide his reader-student through a conscious process in view of each one’s culture, sense of duty, self-interest, gender, religion, science and consequences to an honest decision as to how to understand war and one’s own participation in it.”
  • Book Review –  Through a glass darkly : the U.S. holocaust in Central America, by Thomas R. Melville. Reviewed by Arthur J. Kubrick.  –  Favorable Review of the story of Fr. Ron Hennessy, “a Maryknoller who came to Guatemala in 1964, and his work among the Mayan people in El Peten and San Mateo Ixtatan as they struggled to survive the repression by the military and the government, and the efforts of the guerilla forces to overthrow this same government.”

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

March / April 2006

November 19, 2006

The March/April 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker focused on a Catholic march to to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to try and visit detainees held by the United States. [Daniel’s note: Read an article about the protest.]. Since so many of the articles look at the same event from slightly different perspectives, I won’t provide individual digests for these “pilgrimage articles.”

  • Articles concerning the pilgrimage march to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba:
    • Pilgrimage to Guantanamo by Matthew W. Daloisio
    • True Weapons of the Spirit by Tanya Theriault
    • To Walk & Not Grow Weary by Amanda W. Daloisio
    • The Work of Love and Mercy by Matt Vogel
    • Hunger for Righteousness by Frida Berrigan
    • Hospitality in Havana by Anna Brown
  • A Look Back at the Bureau by Robert Ellsberg  –  An excerpt from the June 1979 Catholic Worker examining the Catholic Worker’s FBI file as obtained through the Freedom of Information Act. File covers from 1948 through 1970s. 
  • Companions of Jesus by Joseph E. Mulligan, S.J. –  An excerpt from Fr. Mulligan’s journal written in 2004 while serving a 90-day sentence for “crossing the line” at Ft. Benning in protest of the US Army’s School of the Americas. The School of the Americas is now known as the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation.
  • Peter Maurin Farm by T. Christopher Cornell – Uses the five joyful mysteries from the Catholic Rosary to mediate on farm life.
  • Grassroots Hope in Haiti by Theresa Kronenburger – Highlights the work of nongovernmental organizations bringing hope and positive change to Haiti including The Haiti Connection, Haiti Reborn, Gift of Water, Fon Koze.
  • Erich Probst, 1933-2005 by Joe and Sabra McKenzie-Hamilton – Obituary of Korean War paratrooper and Catholic Worker resident Erich Probst.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have two suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

January / February 2006

November 19, 2006

The January/February 2006 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Walk to Visit Prisoners by Editors –  Announces a December 5, pilgrimage to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to try and visit detainees held by the United States. [Daniel’s note: Read an article about the protest. ]
  • Witness Against Torture by Editors –   Justification for the Guantanamo Bay protest by the group Witness Against Torture.
  • All Saints vs. the State by Matt Vogel – Uses the IRS scrutiny of All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena CA to suggest that churches should free themselves from tax-exempt status to lessen threats to their Christian witness. 
  • Allegiance to Conscience by Stephen Kobasa – Teacher’s account of how he was fired from Kolbe Cathedral High School in Bridgeport CT for failing to display an American flag in his classroom. Points out the lack of a written requirement to keep a flag in the Catholic school classroom.
  • St. Joseph House by Tamara Sandy – Description of one’s person conversion of heart through soup kitchens and Catholic Worker activities.
  • Veterans for Peace by Bill Griffin – Description of recent Veterans for Peace activities, inlcluding a national speaking tour of Vietnamese Agent Orange victims.
  • True Altruism by Martin Luther King, Jr.  –  An excerpt from Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community (Harper and Row, NY, NY 1967). This excerpt posits that the “ultimate solution to the race problem lies in the willingness of men to obey the unenforceable. [Daniel’s note – See also speech of the same name.]
  • A Humble Worker by Shelly Estrin – A letter from a reader reflecting on the woodcuts of Fritz Eichenberg.
  • Saints of Chilean Labor by Jerry Ryan – Comparison of the lives and political approaches of Christians Fr. Alberto Hurtado and Clotario Blest in the Chilean labor movement from the 1940s through the Pinocet dictatorship.
  • Hospitality Along the Way by Jim Reagan – Description of a day-long set of workshops, prayer and reflection that took place at the Dorothy Day center of St. Francis College, along with some travels in the Southwest. 
  • Ellen Glick, 1941-2005 by Joanne Kennedy – Obituary of artist and activist Ellen Glick.
  • Book Review – In The Name of Democracy: American War Crimes in Iraq and Beyond, edited by Jeremy Brecher, Jill Cutler and Brendan Smith. Reviewed by Tom Cornell –  Favorable review of a six part book which documents alleged American war crimes through government documents, news reports, and reports of human rights organizations. Examines published military doctrine in the light of international law.
  • Book Review – Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: America, the Cold War and the Roots of Terror, by Mahmood Mamdani. Reviewed by Bill Griffin  –  Favorable review of a book characterized as a “prophetic protest against all racial and religious stereotyping and against every form of terrorism including that of powerful governments which proclaim a belief in democracy.”

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have two suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.


December 2005

November 19, 2006

With this issue of the Catholic Worker Digest, I would like to thank Phil Runkel of  Marquette University for offering to be a resource for people seeking articles from past issues of the Catholic Worker.

The December 2005 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Lives Given for Others by Jane Sammon –  Reflections on several Catholics who died for justice and their faith in 1980, the same year that Dorothy Day died.
  • Long Haul for Gulf’s Poor by Suzette Ermler – Reflects on the continued suffering of the people displaced by Hurricane Katrina. Suggests that in the immediate aftermath, government did more harm than good.
  • War on Truth at Guantanamo by Tanya Theriault – Summarizes reports and testimony on the treatment of detainees in the US prison in Cuba. Details several hunger strikes by prisoners and notes changes in US terminology to hide the hunger strikes (i.e. “assisted feeding” vs. “forced feeding.”
  • Margaret Mudd by Tom Cornell – Obituary of scholar and friend of Catholic Workers. Died August 11, 2005 after a long battle with Cancer. Co-edited No Time to Grieve, memoirs of Helene Iswolsky.
  • Knowledge of Salvation by Matt Vogel – Reflections on Advent readings with aim of finding ways of preparing during advent like Catholics prepare during Lent.
  • Housing Here and Now by Jim Reagan – Reports on summer 2005 living conditions protests undertaken by Housing Here and Now and other groups in New York City.
  • Please Help (Letter from El Salvador) by Lizz Kaune – 
  • Book Review – Dreadful Conversions: The Making of a Catholic Socialist. By John C. Cort. Reviewed by Tom Cornell –  Favorable review of the memoirs of early Catholic Worker and later labor activist John Cort. Book covers time period from 1930s to at least the late 1960s and includes information on Seaman’s strike of 1936-37, the establishment of the National Maritime Union, and the Association for Catholic Trade Unionists (ACTU).
  • Book Review – Calming the Fearful Mind: A Zen Response to Terrorism, by Thich Nhat Hanh. Reviewed by Brook Garrison  – Favorable review of a book by Zen Buddist monk Thich Nhat Hanh (who was  a contemporary of Thomas Merton). Book presents teachings aimed at curbing the desire for retaliation and at responding with forgiveness and passion. Review points outs that Hahn approves of countries using military force when they are invaded.  Search results on title from Google.
  • Br. Roger Schultz, 1915-2005 by Bill Griffin – Obituary of the founder of the Taize movement. Br. Roger founded the movement in 1940 during the Nazi occupation of France. Murdered August 16, 2005.
  • Anthony Gawron, 1946-2005 by Bernie Connaughton – Obituary of St. Joseph House Worker and artist. Restored the Stations of the Cross at NYC’s Our Lady of Sorrows Church on Pitt St. Died September 2, 2005.
  • Tom Clarke, SJ 1918-2005 by John Clarke – Obituary of Jesuit author and activist who worked with Dorothy day and Phillip and Daniel Berrigan.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have two suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

October / November 2005

November 19, 2006

The  October/November 2005 issue of the Catholic Worker was dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the death of Dorothy Day on November 29, 1980 and featured the following articles:

  • On Pilgrimage by Dorothy Day – A reprint of Dorothy Day’s December 1969 column. She covers people and speaking enagements she had in the prior month. 
  • At Home in the Heart of God by Anne Marie Kaune – A reminisance of Dorothy Day by a worker who knew her in the early 1970s.
  • The Angels in the Kitchen by Kathleen DeSutter Jordan – A reminisance of Dorothy Day by a worker who knew her in the 1970s.
  • Maryhouse by Amanda W. Daloisio – I usually do not summarize this recurring section because it is a random collection of notes, visitors, etc. This month’s Maryhouse reflects on the value and dignity of work, especially in the sense of living in a Catholic Worker House.
  • True Thoughts by Mike True – A short letter praising the life of Dorothy Day and comparing her to John Henry Newman.
  • Freedom to Be and Become by Michael Scahill – Remembrance of Dorothy Day by a worker who was criticized for writing an article in the Catholic Worker that questioned movement’s commitment to nonviolence. Article stresses Dorothy Day’s tolerance of and encouragement of different viewpoints.
  • Hospitality and Labor by Elizabeth Peterson – Rememberance of Dorothy Day by a woman who was shown kindess by Dorothy Day during the early 1950s. Also provides a great example what being truly pro-life is all about – taking care of a family!
  • Gratitude for Each Other by Martha Hennessy – Dorothy Day is remembered by her granddaughter. She stressed Dortothy Day’s concern for community.
  • Book Review – Peter Maurin: Apostle to the World. By Dorothy Day with Francis J. Sicius. Reviewed by Bob Gilliam –  Favorable review of a 1947 Dortothy Day manuscript with additional modern connecting and framing narrative from Francis Sicius.
  • Book Review – Smallest Witnesses: The Crisis in Darfur Through Children’s Eyes. Reviewed by Padraic O’Neil  –  Favorable review of a collection of children’s drawings that “capture the system violence against civilians” occuring in Sudan’s Darfur region. Drawings are notable for their portaryal of Sudanese gov’t military equipment such as Kalashnikovs, military helicopters, MiGs and tanks.  Yahoo results for book title.
  • In Memory of Roger LaPorte by Tom Cornell – Recounting of the 1965 self-immolation of anti-war activist Roger LaPorte. Article discusses the leadup to the incident and mourning of the local worker community. Article makes it very clear that setting oneself on fire is not an acceptable method of protest, while having compassion for disturbed individuals. 

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have two suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

August / September 2005

November 19, 2006

The following articles appeared in the August/September 2005 issue of the Catholic Worker:

  • Elmer Maas, 1935-2005 by Marta Daniels – Eulogy delievered at Funeral Mass of professor and and peace activist Elmer Maas. 
  • A Rememberance of Hiroshima by Pedro Arrupe, SJ – First hand account of the devastation left by the first atomic bombing by a medical missionary. I treated this article at length in a LISNews journal entry earlier this summer.
  • Idolatry and Nationalism by Martha Hennessy – Excerpts from an interview conducted by Martha Hennessy with William Sloan Coffin, Presbyterian minister, who served as chaplin of Yale University during the Vietnam War. Reminds readers that the state is not God and examines what a biblical politics would require.
  • Nuclear Disarmament by Archbishop Celestino Migliore – Excerpts from a May 4, 2003 UN speech reminding the nuclear powers that they too have many unfulfilled responsibilties under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.
  • Not Just a Few Bad Apples by Bill Griffin – Pulls together a number of public sources to suggest that torture-like treatment is government policy, not an aberation. [Daniel’s note: the Administration’s unwillingness to agree to formal treatment standards support this theory.]
  • For the Well Being of All by Dorothy C. Buck – Description of the interfaith (Christian/Muslim) badaliya prayer movement. More information about the movement can by obtained by writing 175 Elm St, Somerville, MA 02144. The movement also has a web page.
  • Steps to Peace are Complex by Jen Betz – An examination of the roots of the current north-south conflict in Sudan. Includes some first hand accounts.
  • Catholics and Conscience by Paul Frazier –  Reviews the recent history of the Catholic Conscientious Objector (CO) movement and provides advice to young people on building a CO file that will hold up under scrutiny in the event of a draft. [Daniel’s Note: information on building a CO file can be found in several places, including “military free schools”.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.

June / July 2005

November 19, 2006

The following articles appeared in the June/July 2005 issue of the Catholic Worker:

  • Jeffrey Lucey, Rest in Peace by Claire Schaeffer-Duffy – Story of combat-stress related death of Marine Reservist Jeffrey Lucey who committed suicide in June 2004. Article appears to have drawn on interviews with Jeffrey’s parents.
  • We Remember John Paul II by Catholic Worker Editors – Mostly positive evaluation of the legacy of Pope John Paul II. Notes that in addition to his well known condemnation of communism, John Paul II “excoriated” corporate capitalism in his major social encyclicals: Laborem Excercens (1981), Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (1987) and Centesimus Annus (1991).
  • Our Downfall is to Forget by David McReynolds – A review of events since March 2003 and reflections on the responses of people who feel their country has taken the wrong path.
  • Basta CAFTA! by Stephen Weil – Expresses the opinion that in Guatemala, the main effect of CAFTA will be the enrichment of the wealth at the expense of the poor and the environment.
  • A Narrow Path  by Bishop Alvaro Ramazzini Imeri of San Marcos – Excerpts from the Bishop’s April 13, 2005 testimony before the House International Relations Committee.  His full testimony (8 page PDF file) can be found on the committee’s web site.  Catholic Worker did not note that Bishop Ramazzini appeared as a guest of Republican Rep. Henry Hyde of Illinois.
  • Book Review: Dorothy Day: Writings from Commonweal, edited by Patrick Jordan. The Liturgical Press, Collegeville MN, 2002 Reviewed by Tanya Theriault – Favorable review of a book of Dorothy Day’s columns and stories for Commonweal Magazine from 1929-1973.
  • Letters for Freedom – Navajo classroom letters to China on behalf a Tibetan disident offered as one of the traditional Catholic Works of Mercy.
  • Book Review: Peace in the Post-Christian Era by Thomas Merton. Orbis Books, Maryknowll, New York, 2004. Reviewed by Bill Griffin – Favorable review of  a work first drafted by Thomas Merton in 1962, but not completely published until 2004. Much of this book was previously published as Seeds of Destruction. Argues that Merton’s ideas are just as current today as they were in the early 60s. 
  • Private Plan for NYC Park by Jonathan Greenberg – Expresses concern about the proposed private-led development of Washington Square Park in New York City. Suggests that local residents, especially the poor will lose a valuable public space.
  • A Reason for Our Hope by Robert Ellsberg with an introduction by the Catholic Worker Editors – The Editors of Catholic Worker express their dismay over the Vatican pressured resignation of Fr. Thomas Reese as the editor of the Jesuit magazine America. The Ellsberg piece offers the example of Fr. Henri Lacordaire as hope for the future. Fr. Lacordaire worked for renewal of Catholic life in 19th Century France and often took abuse from both church and state.

———————

As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have two suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

To Subscribe:

Even you if you don’t like what you see here, I encourage you to try a subscription to the Catholic Worker. They will give you a subscription for $0.25/year (If you want to cover the actual costs of a subscription, send them $10). You can hardly do better than a quarter a year!

Send your subscription requests to:

Catholic Worker
36 East 1st St.
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212-777-9617 or 212-677-8627.

Even if you think you hate the Catholic Worker movement and all it stands for, subscribe anyway. See what the other side is doing. Also get it for the obituaries. Nowhere else will you find people memorializing the marginalized the way the Catholic Worker celebrates the lives that come through their houses of hospitality. Everyone can learn something about how to see every person’s dignity by perusing these obituaries.