Archive for January, 2008

December 2007

January 30, 2008

The December 2007 issue of the Catholic Worker featured the following articles:

  • Deportations and Families by Members of the New Sanctuary Movement – Two concrete examples of how current immigration policies are anti-family.
  • Between Iraq and Jordan by Cathy Breen – Three letters detailing troubles of Iraqi refugees in Jordan and Syria. Highlights Syria’s relative generosity and describes a visit to the monastery of St. Moses the Abyssinian.
  • Maryhouse by Amanda W. Daloisio – Reflections on gratitude. Mentions Teresa of Avila, Wendell Berry, Kathy Kelly, and St. Therese of Lisieux.
  • Christ’s Peace is Our Work by Jim Reagan – Reflections on the Christian obligation for peacemaking. Notes that the proportion of civilians among those killed or wounded in war has risen from 5% in World War I to 75% in today’s conflicts. Expresses opinion that war doesn’t simply halt the Corporal Works of Mercy, but actually reverses them.
  • Education on the Inside by Sammy Moore – Excerpt from a speech presented to the New Jersey State NAACP Convention on September 22, 2007 by the president of the NJ NAACP prison chapter president. Mr. Moore is currently serving 40 years to life. He describes his efforts to become educated, the difficulties prisoners have in becoming educated and the moral practical benefits of educating prisoners. Briefly describes the work of the NAACP Prison Project.
  • Mohammed Eausack, 1926-2007 by Matt Vogel – Obituary of a sick Muslim elder who came to the NY Catholic Worker house via his doctor at a homeless shelter. Described as gentle and witty, Mr. Eausack was a “great symbol of stubborn strength for many in the house. Though he slowed, he never really stopped fighting, struggling to get through the day.”
  • Pizza Resistance by Matt Vogel – Relates the store of resistance against the death penalty and hunger inspired by Death Row inmate Philip Workman‘s request that a homeless person be given a vegetarian pizza in lieu of Workman’s last meal.
  • An Italian Christmas Tale by Jack Cook – A retelling of the legend of La Befana, a woman who searches for her dead son and recognizes him in the baby Jesus.
  • Book Review: A Power Governments Cannot Suppress. By Howard Zinn. City Lights Books, San Francisco, CA 2007. Reviewed by Gene Roman. – Favorable Review of a compilation of essays Zinn wrote for The Progressive. The article says that Zinn “digs through the archives of American history to shine a bright light on union struggles for a decent wage, religious resistance to war and the policies of US Presidents from George Washington to George W. Bush.”
  • Book Review: People Power: Fifty Peacemakers and Their Communities. By Michael True. Rawat Publications, Jaipur, India, 2007. Reviewed by Jane Sammon. – Favorable review of a book profiling Thomas Merton, Howard Zinn, Delores Huerta, Adin Ballou, and Abigail Kelly, among others.

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As far as I know, the text and woodcut graphics of the Catholic Worker are not available on-line. If you would like the full text of an article that I mention here, I have three suggestions:

1) Try to borrow the article through Interlibrary Loan.

2) Contact the archivist for the CW at Marquette University:

Phil Runkel
Archivist
Department of Special Collections and University Archives
Raynor Memorial Libraries
Marquette University
1355 W. Wisconsin Ave, PO Box 3141
Milwaukee, WI 53201-3141
414-288-5903
http://www.marquette.edu/library/collections/archives/day.html

3) Try contacting the Catholic Worker directly. They MAY be willing to send you the article, though I don’t know if they have morgue files. It seems likely they do, since they often reprint Dorothy Day articles. Contact information for Catholic Worker appears in the “subscribe” section below.

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